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trentvoyager

A funny thing happened on the way to this forum

Strange day yesterday.

Where I work I have to occasionally travel to our other site to train people to use a computer system.

The other site is the home of our A & E dept (except they've gone all American on our asses and call it ED [which just makes me think of: "A horse is a horse, of course, of course....."])

Anyway after I finished the training I had lunch and was preparing to return to my base when I got the most tremendous pain in my abdomen/chest and was promptly very sick. The pain continued afterwards - so I just sat there thinking "hmmm....that tuna cob was a bit dodgy"....after a couple of hours it had not improved - so a colleague suggested I took myself off to ED.

This I did - where I was promptly whisked through to have an ECG and blood tests etc. They were clearly worried (as was I) that I might have had a heart attack and told me they needed me to stay there till 7.30 to have another blood test for Troponin which identifies damage to the heart muscle (is this correct, Lexi?).. I was admitted to a ward and waited patiently. Blood test done - result back - no MI thankfully!

In the meantime a very nice (and when I say nice I mean "I wish I was feeling better than I do so I can invite you out for a drink" nice) doctor poked and prodded my abdomen and surrounding areas and produced yelps of pain from me.

Conclusion after much consultation with other medics is that I probably have gallstones - so next step is an Ultrasound. I feel back to (what  passes for) normal today.

Main point is though, how thoroughly professional, caring and friendly the staff were - if I hadn't felt so ill I would have positively enjoyed it.

Thought I'd share because frequently we hear horror stories about the NHS - which undoubtedly happen - but there is loads of good solid professional practice going on.
Leonard James

Very interesting, Trent. Like you, whenever I have a problem and am attended by a dishy doctor, my thought inevitably turn to what a girl's been thinking about all winter.

Hope the results turn out better than you think!

PS. The consultant cardiologist I have to see once a year is very eligible. The Spanish health system is A1 too.
Jim

Re: A funny thing happened on the way to this forum

TV, you must have been going spare yesterdai!
I'm glad things are (relatively) OK for you, and, as Lexi will no doubt tell you, gallstones aren't the big deal they used to be decades ago.
I'm with you 100% on the NHS thing. The doctors who've dealt with me (though threatening, hopefully tongue in cheek, to use a hammer) have always been excellent and faultless inevery way.
The nursing staff DID have some issues when dealing with a blind in-patient, but, as soon as I advised them on guidance and other niggling trifles, they were superb in every way.
We don't know just how lucky we are to have the NHS we DO have.
Shaker

I can sincerely sympathise, trent, and hope you're feeling better.

About five years ago I developed a slight but persistent nagging pain on the right-hand side of my abdomen, just under my ribs. I didn't think much of it and put it down to a muscle strain. After a week of it, however, and with a slight but noticeable increase in severity I finally made an appointment with my GP. I was examined, and on the basis of the position of the pain and the description of it, my doctor concluded that I most probably had gallstones. I was given some strong painkillers (Co-Codamol, possibly - can't really remember) and an appointment for an ultrasound scan early in the next week. This was about 4:30 on a Friday afternoon, incidentally.

Never made it to the ultrasound - not that one, anyway. That same Friday night I had dinner and went to bed as usual at about 10:00pm, dropping off quickly and easily as always. After about an hour or so of peaceful kip I was woken by what I still regard as the most excruciating physical pain I have ever known. I've broken things, burnt myself, cut myself, fallen and whatnot - all the usual bumps, tumbles and scrapes of everyday life - but this was and is the worst agony I've ever experienced. I can't imagine being stabbed is any more painful. I have never known pain so severe that I actually had to crawl up and downstairs on my hands and knees, one step at a time and taking about three minutes for each one, leaving a trail of sweat, snot and saliva behind me. Finally I managed to get to the couch downstairs - probably took me half an hour to do that.

NHS Direct unfortunately proved to be as useful as a chocolate fireguard and so, in the end, an ambulance was called. After a good session on the gas and air (nice) and as much morphine as paramedics are allowed to dispense (even better) I was whisked into the local infirmary at about two o'clock on the Saturday morning (tail-end of the piss-up crowd, unfortunately) for an unplanned long weekend in a hospital bed on a drip. An ultrasound confirmed that at that time I had what's known - I dare say you'll be familiar with this trent - as biliary 'sludge' which was on the move, hence all that pain. Cholecystectomy (gallbladder removal - I soon made myself an armchair expert on gallbladder anatomy) was fleetingly mentioned at one point but nothing was done because after a couple of days I was back to my usual self and was discharged. This was December 1st so I was actually climbing the walls to get out, get back home and start decorating for Christmas.

I've had a few extremely minor twinges from time to time since then - nothing worth mentioning - but a subsequent ultrasound last year confirmed that I've now been upgraded: it's not sludge any more but proper, honest-to-goodness gallstones now. Fortunately, although on occasion I've been given the hard sell about having my gallbladder removed, they're not a problem: I've managed to keep my gallbladder complete with stones and they're really not an issue. Or rather they haven't been as yet, touch wood. A vast swathe of the population has gallstones which they don't and never even know about until and unless it's picked up by accident while looking for something else, so it's perfectly possible to live with them. I'm slightly surprised that gallstones were given an initial tenative diagnosis of a heart attack because the pain of gallstones is in one very definite, specific place - on the right hand side, under the ribs, radiating through to your back: I described it as like having somebody run you through with a sword - which believe me is once felt, never forgotten. I know there's such a thing as referred pain, but still ... An ultrasound will confirm it beyond doubt.

Best wishes, anyway!

I've nothing but fulsome praise for the NHS - not only in my own (rare) forays into hospital but experiences with family members, the care is absolutely outstanding. I know full well it's most likely different in other areas, and no doubt there are umpteen problems and issues of which I'm not personally aware, but if I have to speak from direct experience I can't overpraise the NHS and its staff. From the paramedics who turned up at stupid o'clock to the last nurse who saw me home and everybody in between (I even had to be taken down to the ultrasound room in a wheelchair, which made me feel like a bit of a prat), the staff were fantastic beyond description.

P.S.

Quote:
In the meantime a very nice (and when I say nice I mean "I wish I was feeling better than I do so I can invite you out for a drink" nice)


You're spoken for, behave yourself.
Ketty

Ah gallstones!  I can confirm, through personal experience, the pain can be far more severe than childbirth.  There you go gents, you can claim parity with women on the pain front.  

It sounds as though you were well looked after TV and there was a little bit of 'something' to add a bit of sparkle to it all.  I'm glad it wasn't a dicky ticker.

Shaker my hubby had an incident similar to yours earlier this year and they wanted him to have his gallbladder removed.  Since we now know what is the problem we've kept everything under control through diet - and since then he's had no more scary incidences.
Shaker

Ketty wrote:
Ah gallstones!  I can confirm, through personal experience, the pain can be far more severe than childbirth.  There you go gents, you can claim parity with women on the pain front.  

I'll tell you one thing - I've heard that the indescribable pain of kidney stones is worse than either and worse than practically anything come to that.

Quote:
Shaker my hubby had an incident similar to yours earlier this year and they wanted him to have his gallbladder removed. Since we now know what is the problem we've kept everything under control through diet - and since then he's had no more scary incidences.

Let me guess - low fat diet?  

P.S. I should say incidentally that either biliary sludge or gallstones proper can be indescribably painful if there's a flare-up for some reason and flare-ups I'm afraid can and do occur at random - the gallstone attack that I had, trent had and Mr Ketty had -, but for the overwhelming majority of the time gallstones are a totally benign thing to have: they don't do anything and don't cause any problems at all. As I said earlier, huge numbers of people have them and never know it until they're picked up during another procedure, so embrace your silent stones  
Ketty

Shaker wrote:

I'll tell you one thing - I've heard that the indescribable pain of kidney stones is worse than either and worse than practically anything come to that.


If it's worse than gallstones, which is worse than giving birth to a baby elephant, then I dare not even think of it!  

Shaker wrote:

Let me guess - low fat diet?  


We've gone as fat free as possible.  Which was a shame whilst we were on our holibobs 'cos there's nothing nicer than freshly cooked fish and chips with loads of salt and vinegar, eaten by the seaside.  It was a small price to pay.

The problem is, where manufacturers cut out fat, they substitute it with sugar.  Low fat or fat free often have far more calories.

Whatever we're doing, it's working so far at least.  And of course, although he's not a believer, he's had lots of prayer.  
trentvoyager

Ketty your post reminded me of this joke:

Quote:

Women always maintain that giving birth is way more painful than a guy getting kicked in the nuts.

Well, after another beer, and some heavy deductive thinking, I have come up with the answer to that question..   Getting kicked in the nuts is more painful than having a baby; and here is the reason for my conclusion.   A year or so after giving birth, a woman will often say, "It might be nice to have another child."  
On the other hand, you never hear a guy say, "You know, I think I would like another kick in the nuts."  






I rest my case.
trentvoyager

Quote:
You're spoken for, behave yourself.


Oh I know - but I do find one of the greatest pleasures in life is window shopping  
Lexilogio

Glad you are feeling a bit better. Gallstones hurts. Not as much as kidney stones, but it still hurts.

But laparoscopic cholecystectomies are very effective.
bnabernard

But laparoscopic cholecystectomies are very effective.

Blimey, is that a new version of the ipad?

bernard (hug)
Lexilogio

bnabernard wrote:
But laparoscopic cholecystectomies are very effective.

Blimey, is that a new version of the ipad?

bernard (hug)


Lol - not quite...
trentvoyager

Thanks for sharing your stories and all your best wishes - I am feeling much better - and looking forward to seeing one of my favourite performers this evening - Alison Moyet.

There was a point on Thursday when I thought I wouldn't get to see her.
Ketty

I am well jel!!

I adore her voice: like smooth chocolate.   You'll enjoy it all the more with the thought you may have been forced to miss it.

Sing loudly, and with gusto - and I hope you're almost word perfect.  
trentvoyager

Ketty wrote:
I am well jel!!

I adore her voice: like smooth chocolate.   You'll enjoy it all the more with the thought you may have been forced to miss it.

Sing loudly, and with gusto - and I hope you're almost word perfect.  


I know - I've been hooked since I saw Yazoo way back in the mists of time - I try to catch her every time she tours as she never fails to amaze me.

This tour is a sort of electronica tour which along with her new album "The minutes" she will also be singing older stuff like "Nobody's Diary" and "Don't go" - altho the highlight for me will be an old, old song of hers called "Winter Kills" which is great (depressing -  but great )
Ketty

Brilliant - I will think of you this evening, singing along.

I loved her best I think back in the old Yazoo days, then she seemed to lose her way for a little while.  But her voice has always remained amazing.
Shaker

trentvoyager wrote:
the highlight for me will be an old, old song of hers called "Winter Kills" which is great (depressing -  but great )


For a Shostakovich fan that's no criticism  
IvyOwl

Glad you're Ok Trent. I've had a couple of episodes  so I know how painful and how frightening it can be.

Quote:
Fortunately, although on occasion I've been given the hard sell about having my gallbladder removed, they're not a problem:


I was advised to have my gallbladder removed but because of what else was going on in my life I deferred it. Well that plus I wasn't totally convinced. It's been several years since I've had an episode but everytime I get a little niggle I get concerned that it might be another one.

The pain is comparable to giving birth to a dead baby (my first confinement) without the benefit of pain relief stuck on your own in a side ward. I tried ringing the bell but was told 'not to make a fuss'. So I didn't. As the pain got worse and worse I just thought 'you can't live through pain like this' so when the next pain came I thought 'oh good I'm dead now' then when the next came I thought 'bloody hell you feel pain when you're dead !!!!' It didn't occur to me that I was actually still alive ..... eeejit!

Eventually a more senior nurse came in from another ward and went ballistic at their having left me on my own especially once I'd told her that the baby was dead! (She'd said I was ready to push and had positioned herself ready to receive 'it' so I thought I'd better warn her.)

Anyway the whole point of that story was to say that the doctor who came to examine me afterwards was ever so dishy with a gorgeous Irish accent. I felt so guilty for having those sort of thoughts at a time like that!

Apparently it's quite normal ... it's the brains way of making the best of a bad situation  
Shaker

That's a terrible story Ivy ... I had no idea    
Leonard James

Blimey, Ivy, that must have been awful! I'm so relieved I ain't a woman!
Ketty

IO my heart breaks at hearing experiences such as that, and words seem so trite.  Such an ordeal is beyond physical pain.

But I can identify with the black humour or inappropriate thoughts - from chatting to others, it appears it's not unusual in the face of unspeakable sadness or tragedy or fear.  Like you say, it's a coping mechanism.
Derek

IvyOwl, I just read this. My goodness me Ivy, I am literally stuck for words, which rarely happens. What can I say to express my sorry at such and arduous ordeal. My dog bit me on the nose last year and I thought I was dying. I now feel ashamed at acting so badly at what is a triviality compared to what you went through. I am sincerely sorry to read this and offer you my heart felt sympathy hoping that you can eventually forget the pain that you had to go through, both physically and emotionally.

Kindest and Most Sincere Regards

Derek (aka Ralph)
Lexilogio

IvyOwl wrote:
Glad you're Ok Trent. I've had a couple of episodes  so I know how painful and how frightening it can be.

Quote:
Fortunately, although on occasion I've been given the hard sell about having my gallbladder removed, they're not a problem:


I was advised to have my gallbladder removed but because of what else was going on in my life I deferred it. Well that plus I wasn't totally convinced. It's been several years since I've had an episode but everytime I get a little niggle I get concerned that it might be another one.

The pain is comparable to giving birth to a dead baby (my first confinement) without the benefit of pain relief stuck on your own in a side ward. I tried ringing the bell but was told 'not to make a fuss'. So I didn't. As the pain got worse and worse I just thought 'you can't live through pain like this' so when the next pain came I thought 'oh good I'm dead now' then when the next came I thought 'bloody hell you feel pain when you're dead !!!!' It didn't occur to me that I was actually still alive ..... eeejit!

Eventually a more senior nurse came in from another ward and went ballistic at their having left me on my own especially once I'd told her that the baby was dead! (She'd said I was ready to push and had positioned herself ready to receive 'it' so I thought I'd better warn her.)

Anyway the whole point of that story was to say that the doctor who came to examine me afterwards was ever so dishy with a gorgeous Irish accent. I felt so guilty for having those sort of thoughts at a time like that!

Apparently it's quite normal ... it's the brains way of making the best of a bad situation  


(((hug)))
IvyOwl

Thank you all for your kind understanding. I went on to lose 6 babies all together (adopted 2 babies in between) but it was all a long time ago and is now just 'history'. There are people who've had to endure far far worse. Mosly without the aid of our wonderful NHS. In spite of the first incident I have nothing but praise for the treatment I received through it all!
Ketty

IvyOwl wrote:
Thank you all for your kind understanding. I went on to lose 6 babies all together (adopted 2 babies in between) but it was all a long time ago and is now just 'history'. There are people who've had to endure far far worse. Mosly without the aid of our wonderful NHS. In spite of the first incident I have nothing but praise for the treatment I received through it all!


When it comes to ultimate pain - whether physical or emotional I don't think there's a weighing scales, but there is certainly a sense of 'there but for the grace of God . . .'.  My experience too of the NHS is that they pull out all the stops and cannot be seriously criticised when it comes to life and death situations.
Ketty

trentvoyager wrote:
I am feeling much better - and looking forward to seeing one of my favourite performers this evening - Alison Moyet.


TV, how was it?  I hope it was fabulous and you're now hoarse from singing.
IvyOwl

Ketty wrote:
trentvoyager wrote:
I am feeling much better - and looking forward to seeing one of my favourite performers this evening - Alison Moyet.


TV, how was it?  I hope it was fabulous and you're now hoarse from singing.


Yep TV hope you enjoyed it all the more for fearing you might have to miss it!

trentvoyager

It was fantastic, of course!

review in local press:

Quote:
http://www.nottinghampost.com/Rev.../story-19997457-detail/story.html


That about covers it - except it missed the fight that broke out 2 rows from us at the end of the concert - which was precipitated by one of the finest putdowns I've heard for many a year.

A female "fan" had been particularly vocal (in a very Nottingham way) for parts of the concert. At the end a man across the aisle from her said in a very loud, clear voice:

"If I'd wanted to hear 2 crackheads screech I'd have gone to forest road*."

Woman slapped him, he pushed her down the stairs of the balcony we were on.

They could have charged more for the floor show.  

* Local red light area.
Ketty

   
ELEVENSES81

Re: A funny thing happened on the way to this forum

trentvoyager wrote:


Thought I'd share because frequently we hear horror stories about the NHS - which undoubtedly happen - but there is loads of good solid professional practice going on.


I've made a formal complaint against my local hospital trust for clinical neglect. Things were fine whilst I was under treatment, but there are no systems to address terminal cancer. The two doctors involved colluded and lied through their teeth that everything was done to help me.  Things got so bad I had to go to my own GP for help and things are fine now.

The chief exec of the trust is both incompetent and lacks in integrity, and instead of him taking a professional  critical stance, has obstructed me at every turn. The inquiry he set up was limp and unquestioning.

I've reported to the General Medical Council and am awaiting o hear if they will initiate their own investigation.  I imagine all involved now regret their behaviour not knowing what an incandescent, bolshy old sod I can be when anyone tries to put one over.
ELEVENSES81

IvyOwl wrote:
Ketty wrote:
trentvoyager wrote:
I am feeling much better - and looking forward to seeing one of my favourite performers this evening - Alison Moyet.


TV, how was it?  I hope it was fabulous and you're now hoarse from singing.


Yep TV hope you enjoyed it all the more for fearing you might have to miss it!



I saw Alison interviewed by Laurie Taylor on Sky Arts and still [and why not] considers herself a creative musician  and would baulk at the notion of doing an 80s tour with the likes of Rick Astley, Spandau and Toyah. She also refuses to sing her hits just because her audience wants to hear them. Personally, compromise wouldn't seem to be a betrayal of her independence. I'm reminded of Neil Young after he grew bored of his sensitive musical persona in the 1970s and migrated into grunge. At one concert he just played his new album. The audience hated it. At the encore he said 'and here's some songs you all know' [loud cheers] and he played the new stuff all over again. What a man!!!!!
Ketty

Re: A funny thing happened on the way to this forum

ELEVENSES81 wrote:
I imagine all involved now regret their behaviour not knowing what an incandescent, bolshy old sod I can be when anyone tries to put one over.


Let's hope you now get the action/answers you deserve.  More power to you.
ELEVENSES81

Ketty,

 it was never my intention to get some useless apology and for it to remain swept under the carpet. I  wanted to bequeath something of value to all patients suffering severe or terminal illness. If that entails exposing the chief exec of my local hospital trust as a useless incompetent fraud and the doctors involved as more concerned to preserve their own professional standing than the welfare of their patients, then good. I also did it because the Glos Clinical Commissioning Group refuse to invest in the type of community care that would have helped people like me - dedicated clinicsal support and more staff. There are just 15 staff for the whole of Gloucestershire to support ALL types of terminal patient with only part-time clinical support.

If the GMC take up my case I will send the following letter to the trust Chief exec:

Dr Harsnet,

  Allying yourself so closely with incompetence and gross misconduct,  obsessing about my chosen clinical  arrangement with my GP and promoting CSPCT as an appropriate outcome for terminal cancer patient care when you know full well that under-funding and under-resourcing has left it potentially dysfunctional and left its membership dispirited,  over-worked without full-time dedicated clinical support, borders on the bizarre, and frankly,  leads one to question both the competence of the CCG to deliver for the people of Gloucestershire, and your office to address any external  criticisms of the governance of the  Hospital Trust in a rational manner.

Sadly it is too late now for you to institute a proper inquiry, and if this is imposed on the Trust from without then you may well have cause for future regret that your office fell short in the timely and ethical  pursuance of its responsibilities as NHS Chief Executive in this matter.

I hope for your sake that the written submissions of your staff are supported by contemporaneous documentation and that they adhered to the professional code as you claim, because the lack of evidence would strongly suggest otherwise
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