Archive for nglreturns.myfreeforum.org Nglreturns is a forum to discuss religion, philosophy, ethics etc...

NGLReturns Daily Quiz - Play here!
 



       nglreturns.myfreeforum.org Forum Index -> All faiths and none
jaqueline

A Psalm

I was laying in the bath earlier just thinking about God being absent and in this darkeness when He turns His back on  you (what the Bible calls hiding His face) does God ever give any help that sustains us or are we so battered down we can't see anything God gives to help us in the darkness?

While musing over this for some reason I found myself begining to smile and I found myself humming and wanting to sing but of course I can't sing and I found myself saying -

'All my life I've always loved You, all my life just to serve
and now I am in in utter darkness and wonder where my God has gone.

And then I recall the gentle breezes and in that breeze the smallest sound. And in that sound the sense of silence and then I knew how oft my God is there.'

And I felt so happy then, a sense of joy bubbling up because even when God hides His face, He is still there.
Ketty

Re: A Psalm

jaqueline wrote:
. . . even when God hides His face, He is still there.


Jim

Re: A Psalm

jaqueline;
That was really beutiful;
Thanks for sharing it.
jaqueline

Thank you.

It's a strange thing but after that I felt completely re-energised as if someone had replaced my batteries and the weariness I have had for so long, even before I had the chest infection, has gone, there is an inner joy.
Jim

As the prophet said
"Do you not know?
    Have you not heard?
The LORD is the everlasting God,
the creator of the ends of the earth.
He will not grow tired or weary, and his understanding
no-one can fathom.
He gives strength to the weary,
    and increases the power of the weak.
Even your young grow tired and weary,
    young men stumble and fall;
but those who wait on the LORD will renew their strength.
They will soar on wings like eagles;
    they will run, and not grow weary,
they will walk, and not be faint.
( Isaiah 40: 28-31 NIV)

When my painkillers don't kick in, and the sleep won't come, or when yet another long cane buckles and I'm miles from home, I'd like to say I simply wait on the LORD and everything's fine.....

     ....I'd like to say it, but I don't. I rage, go into a sulk, toss, turn, moan....but sometimes, when what's left of my mind grasps those verses like a drowning man cluthching a lifebelt, I get the same spiritual feeling you've had, Jaqueline. And, like you, I've found that it isn't a passing fancy: it lifts you up, puts things in perspective, and helps you deal with the next crisis which you know will hit you, eventually.
Ketty

Jim wrote:
. . . I've found that it isn't a passing fancy: it lifts you up, puts things in perspective, and helps you deal with the next crisis which you know will hit you, eventually.


 
jaqueline

I know what you mean Jim because before I got in the bath I was telling Jesus to just go away and I have been saying this for weeks, indeed within the hour I was at it again.

It's not that I don't love God or have given up on Him it is the pain in the darkness, of wanting it to stop and if Jesus goes away it will then go with Him and I will have rest from this pain both physically and emotionally.

While I was away in February visiting my family, I decided instead of going to the same church as my daughter, to go instead to my old church the one Rob and I were married in. I'm glad I followed that impulse. The two churches are part of a group of 4 and they now have a new rector, vicar and curate after a long time without any leadership. By chance it was the new vicar that morning and being the first Sunday in Lent he spoke about Jesus in the wilderness. It was a very powerful sermon.

The vicar said that Jesus went into the wilderness not by choice, not because He decided one day that He fancied going but because He was driven there by the Holy Spirit, He had no choice in the matter but what he did have is the knowledge that as it was the Spirit that put Him there then He would have the means to get through it no matter how hard it was. And when we too find ourselves driven into the wilderness we have this same confidence that God having put us there, this the same God will help us there. The wilderness will change us, challenge us but it will make us stronger in faith, we will come out of it prepared for the work God wants us to do.

Normally I never hear a word said and experience has taught me that anything I do hear I need to pay attention to, so the fact I heard all the sermon except for the last few sentences had a powerful effect on me.

The following week I went to the same church as my daughter and it was the same vicar preaching and he preached on Abraham and God's promises and hope in those promises. This time I heard very little what I did hear very clearly was that 'we were to hope and continue to hope in God's promises, don't give up'

I still tell Jesus to go away, yet stay with me, help us, guide us, forgive us and accept that even in my muddled contary prayers, I still love You, God.
Jim

I have found that, just when you think Jesus isn't there - just when you begin to feel guilty at ignoring that still, small voice you suddenly remember dismissing - something will happen; a sermon hits you in the face, a verse from  a hymn, a word from a friend; whatever, and you discover that the blank you thought you had isn't empty at all, and it never really was.
   I know a couple of years back when I had just lost my mum, for whom I'd been caring constantly, for the last dozen years of her life, and I was faced with virtually re-starting my life from scratch, I just wanted to sit and sit and...well you've been there; I was starting, at the urging of some very dear relatives, to think about the future, when my eye ( I only have one, and it has never been more than twenty percent effective ) decided to try to part company with its' retina. I had to go to hospital. The twenty minute operation actually took five hours, and for the first ten days afterward, I had to ly face-down on the bed, my eye covered.
"Oh, great", I thought. "So much for faith. Where has it got me? Alone, blind and stuck like a corpse on this d*****d thing!"
But I wasn't alone.
I knew that, felt it, almost like a couple of arms round me, and felt the words, rather than heard them "I'm here".
And He was. Oh, I couldn't measure it in a test tube, but I didn't have to. I knew that He was in charge.
And He has been, I know that now as I look back. I'm not saying life is a bed of roses; no-one can expect that, and I don't. But I know He is there, with only my best interest in store for me. That's agreat comfort, especially when I put my spiritual - and sometimes my real - size tens in it...something I'm an expert at!
Lexilogio

I know exactly what you mean, Jim.

A couple of years ago, I was at a funeral for a Christian friend who had died far too young for it to feel anywhere close to fair. As her family were recounting the number of times they had prayed for healing, it was as if Jesus had suddenly sat down next to me and taken my hand in his. The atmosphere then changed, and the family started to talk about how she had been in remission for longer than predicted, how the end had been painless, rather than the potential long drawn out suffering, and we were able to celebrate the wonderful touch she had brought to our lives.
Shaker

Lexilogio wrote:
I know exactly what you mean, Jim.

A couple of years ago, I was at a funeral for a Christian friend who had died far too young for it to feel anywhere close to fair. As her family were recounting the number of times they had prayed for healing, it was as if Jesus had suddenly sat down next to me and taken my hand in his. The atmosphere then changed, and the family started to talk about how she had been in remission for longer than predicted, how the end had been painless, rather than the potential long drawn out suffering, and we were able to celebrate the wonderful touch she had brought to our lives.


Did it occur to anyone to wonder about those people whose remission had been incredibly short (assuming that it wasn't completely absent) and had died in atrocious agony?
Lexilogio

Shaker wrote:
Lexilogio wrote:
I know exactly what you mean, Jim.

A couple of years ago, I was at a funeral for a Christian friend who had died far too young for it to feel anywhere close to fair. As her family were recounting the number of times they had prayed for healing, it was as if Jesus had suddenly sat down next to me and taken my hand in his. The atmosphere then changed, and the family started to talk about how she had been in remission for longer than predicted, how the end had been painless, rather than the potential long drawn out suffering, and we were able to celebrate the wonderful touch she had brought to our lives.


Did it occur to anyone to wonder about those people whose remission had been incredibly short (assuming that it wasn't completely absent) and had died in atrocious agony?


When you are at a funeral - you tend to concentrate on the life of the person whose funeral it is.
jaqueline

Shaker - last November Rob was told his mother had lung cancer, she had a lump the size of a fist in her lung and it was full of fluid, she was coming up to her 89th birthday. She managed to celebrate her birthday but in less than a week she was dead. She had contracted a chest infection and overnight she deteriated and in a matter of a few short hours she was dead. it was all very sudden and a tremendous shock for her family but...they have this blessing she didn't suffer, there was none of the drawn out suffering and constant draining of fluid of her lungs as would have happened otherwise, for that we are grateful.

it was very hard for the family as we had to wait almost 3 weeks for the funeral to be held by then it was almost Christmas. She is buried in a beautiful Cotswolds churchyard under the spreading branches of two huge trees, buried with her is the one thing she really wanted her Book of Common Prayer. I would not say she had an easy life having had kidney cnacer and her husband had died 10years ago but she had what I call a quiet faith that was enough for her to go through lives ups and downs.

By contrast some years ago my cousin's wife got breat cancer and despite treatment died at the age of 42 leaving 3 children adn my previous mother-in-law died at 34 leaving 4 children the younges just 2 years. Life is never easy for both believers and unbelievers what matters is what we do with what life throws at us.

We could be very bitter or we use what's happening for the greater good. To all Christians come the time of when God hides His face from us but the Bible assures us that this is actually a sign that we are God's children we are actually being changed, what you could call from what we are to something much better  - from one glory to another. It is in the darkness we discover who we are, what we are made off.

There is no end to my family's darkness in fact it has just turned for the worst and all I have to hold onto is that surprise of joy when I was in the bath, that assurance, God is here.

Lent is about a wilderness, about a cross and then great darkness but from it comes Easter - a new begining and it is in the Easter message that we have hope.
Jim

The Christian writer Tony Compolo has a great saying for times like this; I've found it very true for me.
"It might seem like Friday night, but Sunday's coming."
It must have seemed the end of everything for those disciples who fled the scene; their shining messiah a bloody wreck in a borrowed tomb.
Their hopes and dreams shattered, their world destroyed.
Then along came Sunday!

       nglreturns.myfreeforum.org Forum Index -> All faiths and none
Page 1 of 1
Create your own free forum | Buy a domain to use with your forum