Archive for nglreturns.myfreeforum.org Nglreturns is a forum to discuss religion, philosophy, ethics etc...

NGLReturns Daily Quiz - Play here!
 



       nglreturns.myfreeforum.org Forum Index -> Hobbies and pastimes
LornaDoone40

Favourite Childrens Books

My favourite childrens literature (in no particular order):

1. Matilda - Roald Dahl (Frankly any of Dahl's childrens books, but this or the BFG, or Georges Marvellous Medicine, or.... )

2. The Phantom Tolbooth - Norton Juster

3. Where the Wild Things Are - Maurice Sendak

4. The Elephant and The Bad Baby - Elfrida Vipont (for very young children)

5. I Am David - Ann Holm

6. Charlottes Web - E B White

7. The Borrowers - Judith Elkin

8. The Chronicles of Narnia - C S Lewis

9. Little Women - Louisa May Alcott

10. Maurice and His Amazing Educated Rodents - Terry Pratchett  (Also Johnny and The Bomb/The Wee Free Men/Hat Full of Sky/Wintersmith)

Any other suggestions?
Shaker

One solid gold classic and one more modern book which deserves to be called a classic:

1. Kenneth Grahame: The Wind in the Willows

2. Penelope Lively: The Ghost of Thomas Kempe

I still re-read them both. Often  
LornaDoone40

admin. wrote:
One solid gold classic and one more modern book which deserves to be called a classic:

1. Kenneth Grahame: The Wind in the Willows

2. Penelope Lively: The Ghost of Thomas Kempe

I still re-read them both. Often  


Oh, I had the most beautiful copy of WitW - rather than the edition with the full colour illustrations, I had a wonderful leather bound edition with prints of the original pencil sketches by E H Shepherd in 1931.

Have never read The Ghost of Thomas Kempe, but will certainly seek it out.

Pukon_the_Treen

Some of my personal favourites:

Alan Garner:
The Owl Service
The Weirdstone of Brisingamen
The Moon of Gomrath

William Mayne:
It
Earthfasts

Lucy M Boston:
The Children of Green Knowe
The Chimneys at Green Knowe
An Enemy at Green Knowe

Susan Cooper:
The Dark Is Rising
Greenwitch
The Grey King

Robert Westall:
The Cats of the Seroster
The Scarecrows
The Watch House
The Wind Eye

Penelope Lively:
The Whispering Knights
The Driftway
The Ghost of Thomas Kemp
The Revenge of Samuel Stokes

Tolkien:
The Hobbit

Older authors:
E. Nesbit
Richmal Crompton
L Frank Baum

Modern Authors:

Philip Pullman
Diana Wynne Jones
Terry Pratchett


On a side note, both J. K. Rowling and C. S. Lewis can kiss my balls – overrated crap.
jeremyp

Anything by Arthur Ransome.
Shaker

Quote:
Susan Cooper:
The Dark Is Rising
Greenwitch
The Grey King


Well spank my butt and call me Shirley - I bought a one-volume edition of all five novels in that series just a couple of weeks ago: I remember reading The Dark is Rising at school. I haven't tackled the full monty yet, but I'm looking forward to doing so.
Dave B

Not having any kids off my own and all my nephs & nieces grown up and dispersed who knows where - and even the friend's and neighbour's kids I used to borrow to watch certain films now going to uni I don't get much chance of reading kids books any more.

Though I did buy what I thought was a sci-fi (OK, some say that's for grown up kids) book in a £ shop. It turns out that it was for 12 up. I was suitably astonished, it was a great story (about mobile cities), very well written and pulled no punches on what might be called "adult issues" (up to a certain point of course.)


I do enjoy the Harry Potter books and an pleased to see that there is some other good, well written, stuff for kids out there.

I never got round to Winnie the Poo etc. as a kid, was never read to and had my nose stuck in text books and sci-fi almost as soon as I started independent reading.
Lexilogio

My kids are a bit young for some of these.

I loved Maurice Sendak

I would also highly recommend Noah's Rocket by Tony Frais - it's a wonderful take on the Noah's Ark story.

David Williams Mr Stink is recently published and is an absolutely wonderful kids book (it's David Williams aka Little Britain). Apparently its David Williams second kids book, but I haven't read the first one yet.

As a child myself, I was a big Little Women by Louisa May Alcott fan. Plus Tolkein of course.
krysta25uk

CS Lewis
Hate Harry Potter
Susan Cooper - The Dark is Rising series
Hate Harry Potter
Stephenie Meyer - Twilight series is suppose to be good.
Tolkien's Hobbit
Famous Five
Secret Seven
Philip Pullman
Roald Dahl
Winnie the Pooh
Flicka - can't remember the author though
Billy Bunter of Grey Friars
Robinson Crusoe, Black Beauty, Alice in Wonderland, Treasure Island, Water babies
Holes
My son enjoys the Beast Quest books by Adam Blade
Hate Harry Potter

All I can think of at the moment
Pukon_the_Treen

Quote:
Well spank my butt and call me Shirley - I bought a one-volume edition of all five novels in that series just a couple of weeks ago: I remember reading The Dark is Rising at school. I haven't tackled the full monty yet, but I'm looking forward to doing so.

The first of the series (Over Sea, Under Stone) is nothing special, a bit too Enid Blyton really, but don't be put off; trawl through it and read the rest.  The Dark is Rising, Greenwitch and The Grey King are all excellent.  Silver on the Tree is weird though.
Lexilogio

I always loved CS Lewis.

I'm slightly surprised at people hating Harry Potter, although never having read the English versions, I may be missing some aspects in translation.
Tom Cruising

I am amazed at people 'hating' Harry Potter.

Yes it is extremely over-hyped but as modren literature for CHILDREN it is very, very good. In this world of children stuck behind PCs and Wii's, PS3 and the like I can't fault anything that gets children to actually read.

I'd be interested to know why an adults hate it other than thinking it fashionable to mock it. Probably the same people that jump on the bandwaggon to diss Dan Brown.

For 10/11 year old boys I'd recommend the Cherub series and the Henderson Boys stuff by Robert McSomething (sorry). My eldest's current read is "HUNGER" which follows on from "GONE" by some children's equivalent of Stephen King. Can't remember the name - Michael something I think.

Skullduggery Pleasant books by Derek Lancy are good too (although I thought there was too much fighting in them).

I imagine the Twilight series is good for girls that are able at reading.

Goosebump series are popular if only to get the little devils interested in the joys of reading.

For younger readers - Magic Tree House series by Mary Pope Osbourne went down a treat and were surprisingly subliminally educational.

I've got an 8 year old that loves the Scream Street series.

Then the very young - you can't get much better than the Donaldson/Scheffler books - The Grufalo and the Monkey Puzzle.
krysta25uk

I just couldn't get into Harry Potter, I keep trying to read them but no such look, saw the movies but wasn't impressed.  

I actually enjoy Dan Brown's books although slightly bit disappointed in the Lost Symbol.
Lexilogio

Quote:
I'd be interested to know why an adults hate it other than thinking it fashionable to mock it. Probably the same people that jump on the bandwaggon to diss Dan Brown.



I'm officially not part of the bandwagon. I was one of the first people to metaphorically rip a Dan Brown book to shreds in a review I did for a national newspaper a few years ago - along with a few others. Poor characterisation, sloppy research, poor excuse for a thriller..... (if I remember what I wrote correctly).
Pukon_the_Treen

Quote:
I am amazed at people 'hating' Harry Potter.


Hate is a bit too strong a term, but I am confused and annoyed by their popularity among adults.  The use of language is very good, but the setting is fairly mundane, the characters unoriginal the plot unremarkable.  It seems to have been popular with people (adults) who don't normally read fantasy, possibly because it taps into some of that pre-war English nostalgia; tea and crumpets, boarding school, Billy Bunter and so on.  The moral message is weak; it's that plucky kind of Enid Blyton, C. S. Lewis 'stick by your chums and sort out the rotters' morality, which is all very well but pretty limited and patronising these days.  I thought the idea often expressed that non-magical people were stupid, 'not like us' and beneath contempt (even making up a 'nigger' kind of word for them too) was particularly bad; compare that to the ideas of power carrying social responsibility that you will find in Terry Pratchett's books, particularly the 'witches' ones with Tiffany Aching, which are aimed at children.

The most annoying thing however was Rowling herself and her attitude towards the fantasy genre.  She claimed that she didn't really think Harry Potter was fantasy (the wizards, dragons, unicorns,goblins and similar should have been a hint), freely admitted that she didn't read fantasy but also claimed that before she turned up it was all just knights in shining armour and damsels in distress.

Now, I have read a lot of fantasy and the idea that she was the only fresh thing on the menu is nonsense; if anything one possible reason for her popularity is that she was a return to more conservative themes.

It's not been knights and damsels for well over a hundred years.  You've got the mythology of Lord Dunsany's baroque fairy tales and Tolkien's Anglo Saxon saga as well as Fritz Leiber's grim but razor sharp wit as he describes his Lovecraftian worlds of sword and sorcery.  Then there's Mervyn Peake's rich uncanny and symbolic dreams, the Neopagan Arthurian magic stories of Susan Cooper and Alan Garner in the sixties and seventies, then Ursula Le Guin's fantasy, tinged with her feminist and socialist politics.  Then followed the wildly free and anarchic, doomed and decadent psychedelic sci-fi fantasy of Michael Moorcock, and the bleak but beautiful melancholy of the futuristic surreal fantasy stories of M. John Harrison, Jack Vance or Gene Wolfe, then Stephen Donaldson's dark and subtle stories of political and personal betrayal, subterfuge and deceit in the Thomas Covenant stories and Mordant's Need.  For kids, no one beats the scope, wit, characters, imagination and creativity of Diana Wynne Jones, and Terry Pratchett's mixture of satire, humour and morality is likewise in a class of it's own.  Then there is where fantasy meets horror, with the seething steam-punk dystopian cities of China Mieville, Neil Gaiman's elegantly chilling unreality, and Clive Barkers grotesque and gorgeous nightmares.

Knights in shinning armour and damsels in distress? The woman is arrogant and ignorant.

       nglreturns.myfreeforum.org Forum Index -> Hobbies and pastimes
Page 1 of 1
Create your own free forum | Buy a domain to use with your forum