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genghiscant

Offence

Should people have the right, not to be offended? I'm thinking of recent events in France.
bnabernard

People are prone to be offended by the truth, however when it's fraudulent truth then there is a right to take offence.
So who judges truth from truth?
When do you have a quite word say and advise deodorant and when do you put up a bill board.

So here we are with bodies strewed asunder was it deliberate antagonism in return to deliberate antagonism, was any truths falsified?

Where do you start and where do you stop.

bernard (hug)
genghiscant

Are religions above satire?Does taking the micky out of god, Jesus or mohammed justify the sort of reaction witnessed this week? Should a religions idea of blasphemy be illegal?
bnabernard

genghiscant wrote:
Are religions above satire?Does taking the micky out of god, Jesus or mohammed justify the sort of reaction witnessed this week?


Depends if you are saying, ''is it alright to take the piss out of God'' and then, ''is it alright for man to take a vengful reaction in bloody terms on Gods behalf''

Then the  posed  conundrum simply by refering to a number of Gods.

bernard (hug)
Ketty

genghiscant wrote:
Are religions above satire?


They shouldn't be, but some folk do like to take umbrage especially on somebody else's behalf.

genghiscant wrote:
Does taking the micky out of god, Jesus or mohammed justify the sort of reaction witnessed this week?


Nothing at all justifies the murders.

genghiscant wrote:
Should a religions idea of blasphemy be illegal?


Whether in men's terms it's illegal or not is irrelevant to the Lord God Almighty.  He's made it clear what it is to blaspheme, and what are the consequences for doing so.
Jim

Re: Offence

genghiscant wrote:
Should people have the right, not to be offended? I'm thinking of recent events in France.







https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxo81Ok9Urk




No!
genghiscant

Are there any things that should be above humour? e.g. berevement.
trentvoyager

genghiscant wrote:
Are there any things that should be above humour? e.g. berevement.


I'm minded of the old saying that "You cannot give offence you can only take it".

This is broadly speaking true.

I do, however, think that personally one should always be mindful of other peoples feelings when saying things that you know may be hurtful to them.

But, when it is in a broader context when discussing politics, religion etc - how do you draw any lines as to what may be considered offensive and what may not.

Charlie Hebdo could print as may cartoons as it likes about anything it likes and I will not be offended - but clearly others are.

What is for certain - it was a cartoon folks - that is not a justification for mass murder, however much offence was taken.

And, of course, the shoppers in the Jewish supermarket had not given any offence at all. Except that in some peoples warped minds, I suppose their very existence was an offence.
Jim

[quote="genghiscant:124187"]Are there any things that should be above humour? e.g. berevement.

-


-As long as one laughs at the phoeblles and antics of funerals, rather than at those who are bereaved, then I see humour, not as a hinderence, but an aid to the grieving process.

This link
http://thelaughacademy.com/laughing-your-way-through-grief/
is interesting.

Many funerals I've attended - evem some where the deceased has taken their own life - have included humour of some sort...and none the worse for that.
The wishes of the family are, of course, paramount. If they want people laughing, then no minister/priest/celebrant has, imo, the right to deny them this.
cyberman

Offence

genghiscant wrote:
Should a religions idea of blasphemy be illegal?


Absolutely not! The idea that people should be obliged by law to hold any particular religious belief is absurd.

As for the broader question about being offended - of course we don't have a right not to be offended - because such a right would take away other people's right to offend. When it comes to causing offence, I tend to take the view that people can do so if they want to - I just wish they didn't want to.

I am glad that so far on this thread, the idea of causing offence has not become conflated with the idea of inciting hatred. These are two entirely different things, and discussions are often brought down by the two becoming mixed up.
Ketty

genghiscant wrote:
Are there any things that should be above humour? e.g. berevement.


Humour is in the eye of the beholder.  Morticians, funeral directors and medics will attest to the black humour surrounding death, but bereavement is slightly different.  If somebody pokes fun at another's grieving, that's more a reflection upon the insensitivity and crassness of the 'humourist' rather than their victim.
cyberman

Ketty wrote:
 If somebody pokes fun at another's grieving, that's more a reflection upon the insensitivity and crassness of the 'humourist' rather than their victim.


There's one of my bugbears. When there is a tragedy in the news, of course there are always the office wags and barstool jesters who create or pass on the obligatory jokes about it. That's fine - here's the annoying thing:

Often the joke is utterly crap. No humorous content at all. No comedy merit. But people pretend to be amused, simply because they fear that they will be seen as prudish or oversensitive if they don't. This leads to the 'humourist' mistakenly believing he* has made a funny joke, when he has not. Really irritating.

* I know I have used gender specific language here - but in these cases, I cannot think of a single occasion in my life when the offender has not been a bloke.
genghiscant

[quote="cyberman:124225"]
Ketty wrote:
 If somebody pokes fun at another's grieving, that's more a reflection upon the insensitivity and crassness of the 'humourist' rather than their victim.


There's one of my bugbears. When there is a tragedy in the news, of course there are always the office wags and barstool jesters who create or pass on the obligatory jokes about it. That's fine - here's the annoying thing:

Often the joke is utterly crap. No humorous content at all. No comedy merit. But people pretend to be amused, simply because they fear that they will be seen as prudish or oversensitive if they don't. This leads to the 'humourist' mistakenly believing he* has made a funny joke, when he has not. Really irritating.

* I know I have used gender specific language here - but in these cases, I cannot think of a single occasion in my life when the offender has not been a bloke.[quote]

Yes, these things do tend to be male dominated. They also tend to rely on their shock value.
cymrudynnion

genghiscant wrote:
Are there any things that should be above humour? e.g. berevement.
When it comes to mine I can assure the last laugh will be on me. The service is 2 hours 50 minutes long
5Hymns each of minimum 5 verses, Psalm 109 the longest in the Psalter, the Organist asked to play Bach BV540 Oh and coming in to Pacheballs Canon in D
Jim

So, still not very Christian, then.
I had a distressing time counselling a bereaved daughter last year.
Her dad - a very close friend of mine, and minister, had died in Canada.
His widow organised a memorial service for him, consisting of classical, choral and high brow organ pieces - and a 30 minute eulogy delivered by herself which never mentioned the deceased, or indeed, God.
The music was the kind of stuff James, my friend, avidly loathed.
The service lasted nearly two and three quarter hours - and the minister of the church had to cut it short.
The family members who had to endure such a performance - and that's what it was, rather than an act of worship, alongside grieving for their father's loss, were reduced to sheer, virulent anger...which is about as unchristian as I think one can get.
Not one bit of that could help the body in the box, of course - no funeral can.
genghiscant

My Uncle died two years ago. His funeral was humanist & the last piece of music that he had requested was by Queen, "Another one Bites the Dust".

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