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Shaker

Religion in Britain - 2011 census results

Further data from last year's census have been disclosed, including the stats on religion, which can be seen in table format here. The British Religion in Numbers website summarises the results thus:


Quote:
40% of adults professed no religion, 55% were Christian and 5% of other faiths – age made a major difference, with only 38% of the 18-34s being Christian and 53% having no religion, whereas for the over-55s the figures were 70% and 26% respectively;

74% of respondents had been brought up in some religion (including 70% as Christians, implying a net 15% leakage from Christianity over time) and 25% not, the latter figure rising to 39% among the 18-34s;

35% described themselves as very or fairly religious and 63% as not very or not at all religious – there were no big variations by demographics (even by age), but Londoners (41%) did stand out as being disproportionately religious, doubtless reflecting the concentration of ethnic minorities in the capital;

34% believed in a personal God or gods (ranging from 28% among the 18-34s to 42% of over-55s), 10% in some higher spiritual power, 19% in neither, with 29% unsure or agnostic;

11% of respondents claimed to attend a religious service once a month or more, 27% less often, and 59% never – non-attendance was higher among the young (62% for the 18-34s) than the old (54% for the over-55s) and among manual workers (62%) than non-manuals (56%), while London had the best figure for monthly or more attendance (16%);

16% claimed to pray daily, 12% several times a week, 4% once a week, 7% several times a month, 4% once a month, 24% less often, and 29% never – men (34%) were more likely not to pray at all than women (24%);

79% agreed and 11% disagreed that religion is a cause of much misery and conflict in the world today;

72% agreed and 15% disagreed that religion is used as an excuse for bigotry and intolerance, with a high of 81% in Scotland where sectarianism has often been rife;

35% agreed and 45% disagreed that religion is a force for good in the world, dissentients being more numerous among men (50%) than women (41%);

78% (82% of the over-55s) agreed and 12% disagreed that religion should be a private matter and had no place in politics;

16% agreed and 70% disagreed that Christians and the Church should have more influence over politics in the country – only among the over-55s did the proportion in favour of the proposition scrape above one-fifth;

61% agreed and 18% disagreed that organized religion is in terminal decline in the UK – the over-55s (67%) were most prone to agree and Londoners (21%) to disagree;

40% agreed and 40% disagreed that the decline of organized religion had made Britain a worse place – the over-55s (54%) were twice as likely to agree as the 18-34s (27%);

51% (57% in Scotland) agreed and 32% (37% among men) disagreed that all religions are equally valid;

34% agreed and 49% disagreed that some religions are better than others, men (39%), the over-55s (38%), and Londoners (38%) being disproportionately likely to agree;

49% agreed and 29% disagreed that it is good for children to be brought up within a religion – among the 18-34s opinion divided at 36% each (whereas for the over-55s 64% agreed and 22% disagreed);

40% agreed (rising to 46% of men and 44% of 18-34s) and 39% disagreed that religion is incompatible with modern scientific knowledge;

29% agreed and 54% disagreed that there are some things in life which only religion can explain, the over-55s (35%) placing more trust in religion than the 18-34s (24%);

All in all, these data point to a society in which religion is increasingly in retreat and nominal. With the principal exception of the older age groups, many of those who claim some religious allegiance fail to underpin it by a belief in God or to translate it into regular prayer or attendance at a place of worship. People in general are more inclined to see the negative than the positive aspects of religion, and they certainly want to keep it well out of the political arena.
.

This echoes what this year's British Social Attitudes Survey discovered:

Quote:
Levels of religiosity have declined over the past three decades and are likely to decline further, mainly as a result of generational replacement ... This change - which is likely to continue - can be explained by generational replacement with older, more religious generations dying out and being replaced by less religious generations. There is little evidence that substantial numbers find religion as they get older.


So all in all, despite the eccentricity of some of the results (79% agreed  that religion is a cause of much misery and conflict in the world today; 72% agreed that religion is used as an excuse for bigotry and intolerance; 45% disagreed that religion is a force for good in the world, yet 49% agreed that it is good for children to be brought up within a religion) the overall picture is that we're going in the right direction
cyberman

Re: Religion in Britain - 2011 census results

Shaker wrote:
the eccentricity of some of the results (79% agreed  that religion is a cause of much misery and conflict in the world today; 72% agreed that religion is used as an excuse for bigotry and intolerance; 45% disagreed that religion is a force for good in the world, yet 49% agreed that it is good for children to be brought up within a religion)


I'm not sure that the results are as eccentric as you think.

55% believe religion is a force for good. 49% think it is a good way to bring up children. Quite consistent.

Thinking it is 'used as an excuse' for something bad is irrelevant to the other stats - this doesn't mean you think religion is bad, it menas you think the people using it as an excuse are bad.

Perhaps it is the overlap between people thinking it cuases conflict and people thinking it is a force for good which you find odd.

If I were to ask you "Does the holding of views about politics and social organisation ever cause conflict?" I assume you would answer 'yes'.

If I were to ask you "Can involvement and active interest in politics and social justice ever improve lives for people who suffer", I imagine you might also answer yes.

Politics cause wars, but is nevertheless not in itself a Bad Thing.
Powwow

"going in the right direction" that would be hell in a hand basket?
trentvoyager

Quote:
Politics cause wars, but is nevertheless not in itself a Bad Thing


Call me "Mr Pedantic, nit picker copier of MG stylee" if you want - but politics does not cause war.

People do.

Stupid, stupid people.
Shaker

pow wow wrote:
"going in the right direction" that would be hell in a hand basket?

Only to you and your ilk.

To me it means towards a truly secular society where religion plays no part in politics and is an entirely private concern of diminishing relevance, hopefully leading (in the unlikelihood of its eventual disappearance, which is improbable, unfortunately) to its being pushed outside of everyday life to a minuscule lunatic fringe.
cyberman

trentvoyager wrote:
Quote:
Politics cause wars, but is nevertheless not in itself a Bad Thing


Call me "Mr Pedantic, nit picker copier of MG stylee" if you want - but politics does not cause war.

People do.

Stupid, stupid people.


Well, yes - but then one could equally say religion does not cause war, people do. The two are still analogous.
Shaker

Re: Religion in Britain - 2011 census results

cyberman wrote:
I'm not sure that the results are as eccentric as you think.


No?

49% think it's good for children to be brought up within an ideological framework that 79% think is a cause of much misery and conflict in the world.

That's eccentric as I understand the word. But of course I understand that you have to defend religion at any cost no matter how many knots you have to tie yourself into to do it.
cyberman

Re: Religion in Britain - 2011 census results

Shaker wrote:
But of course I understand that you have to defend religion at any cost no matter how many knots you have to tie yourself into to do it.


I have to do no such thing.

Also, nothing I have written on this thread is in defence of religion, is it?

And, as I have already explained, it is possible to acknowledge that something causes conflict but still think it can be a force for good.
Powwow

LOL. "Only to you and your ilk." Right back at ya!
cyberman

pow wow wrote:
LOL. "Only to you and your ilk." Right back at ya!


I can only assume you don't know what 'ilk' means.

Clue: It is not what we call a moose in Scandinavia
Shaker

trentvoyager wrote:
Quote:
Politics cause wars, but is nevertheless not in itself a Bad Thing


Call me "Mr Pedantic, nit picker copier of MG stylee" if you want - but politics does not cause war.

People do.

Stupid, stupid people.


I wouldn't wholly agree with this - I do think that there's such a thing as a just war which, while an evil, can on the whole be less bad than the thing which it is intended to prevent/stop/destroy. The Second World War falls into this category, IMO. Despite the massive loss of life, destruction, misery and grief that ensued it was right and not stupid to go to war to stop Hitler. It was clear by 1938 (if not earlier, but certainly by then) nothing but force would stop him.
Powwow

Cyber, lol, what are you saying? Shaker has no ilk? LOL Boy cyber, you're full of BS today.
Shaker

pow wow wrote:
Boy cyber, you're full of BS today.


Powwow

Well if you need a meter, old man. LOL
Shaker

pow wow wrote:
Well if you need a meter, old man. LOL

Industrial strength, when somebody accusing cyberman of being full of BS today is so full of shit on a daily basis that he thinks the sky is brown.
Powwow

Said the old goat whose adult diaper needs changing. LOL
northernstar

This only goes to show that North Americans don't do irony. Still wearing your "I'm a Canadian" badge, pow wow?
Powwow

Well I was born here, I vote here and pay my taxes here. So ya, I'm a Canadian. And you're a what? Citizen of the Universe? Nice, congrats!
northernstar

pow wow wrote:
Well I was born here, I vote here and pay my taxes here. So ya, I'm a Canadian. And you're a what? Citizen of the Universe? Nice, congrats!



English, white and proud!!!!! And before you say anything, Ihave no truck with the BNP or any other extremist party, just proud of my ethnicity, oh, and my atheism!!
Powwow

Of course, wouldn't have thought otherwise.
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Powwow

Patriotism is a love for your country. Patriotism is a desire to improve your country and leave it in a better place for your children and grandchildren. Finally patriotism is honouring and keeping faith with all that have gone before you. The ones that toiled day after day creating the nation that you inherited.

Ethnicity. Oh no here is comes!
The Canadian government back in the olden days, thought the best thing for the Indians, us halfbreeds and the Eskimo's, notice my politically incorrectness, was to destroy and bury our culture. Forcing us to blend and melt away into the white European majority. So they took our children away and shipped them hundred of miles to residential schools. In these wonderful institutions of education these little savages were beaten for speaking their native language, the boys had their long hair chopped off, these children suffered years of sexual and verbal abuse. It nearly destroyed us. Today the legacy of those schools lives on. In our communities the suicide rate is over twice that any where else in the nation. Alcohol and drug abuse is rampant and of course violence is a close companion.
Well when I was young I was always pissed off that I wasn't Danish like the rest of my family. But as I grew older and a bit wiser, I came to be proud of the fact that my ancestors were teepee living, wagon burning, scalping, savages. Notice my political incorrectness.lol
Nothing wrong with taking a little pride in where your roots are.
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Powwow

Of course every nation has room for improvement.  One is a patriot when one is out there working on improving your country for future generations.
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Powwow

Why does improving and caring for your neighbourhood mean you don't care about the planet? Why does a patriot, mean that you don't care about other people on the other side of the world? Can't I be a patriot and have a foster child in Haiti? I am and I do.
trentvoyager

Pleinmont wrote:
We are citizens of the world and should be trying to make the whole planet a better place to be, not just our own neck of the woods. For instance global warming is beginning to have an impact and if we don't try to do something about it pretty damn quick everyone in the world will suffer.


Yes - but maybe if we all looked after our own neck of the woods - then the world would become a better place.
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Powwow

You are confusing patriotism and nationalism.
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Powwow

Well they are not so I guess that is your fault. I am a proud Canadian but I love the USA and the UK dearly.
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Powwow

Yes my dear and we're ok with that.
Sean

Re: Religion in Britain - 2011 census results

Shaker wrote:
Further data from last year's census have been disclosed, including the stats on religion, which can be seen in table format here. The British Religion in Numbers website summarises the results thus:


Quote:
40% of adults professed no religion, 55% were Christian and 5% of other faiths – age made a major difference, with only 38% of the 18-34s being Christian and 53% having no religion, whereas for the over-55s the figures were 70% and 26% respectively;

74% of respondents had been brought up in some religion (including 70% as Christians, implying a net 15% leakage from Christianity over time) and 25% not, the latter figure rising to 39% among the 18-34s;

35% described themselves as very or fairly religious and 63% as not very or not at all religious – there were no big variations by demographics (even by age), but Londoners (41%) did stand out as being disproportionately religious, doubtless reflecting the concentration of ethnic minorities in the capital;

34% believed in a personal God or gods (ranging from 28% among the 18-34s to 42% of over-55s), 10% in some higher spiritual power, 19% in neither, with 29% unsure or agnostic;

11% of respondents claimed to attend a religious service once a month or more, 27% less often, and 59% never – non-attendance was higher among the young (62% for the 18-34s) than the old (54% for the over-55s) and among manual workers (62%) than non-manuals (56%), while London had the best figure for monthly or more attendance (16%);

16% claimed to pray daily, 12% several times a week, 4% once a week, 7% several times a month, 4% once a month, 24% less often, and 29% never – men (34%) were more likely not to pray at all than women (24%);

79% agreed and 11% disagreed that religion is a cause of much misery and conflict in the world today;

72% agreed and 15% disagreed that religion is used as an excuse for bigotry and intolerance, with a high of 81% in Scotland where sectarianism has often been rife;

35% agreed and 45% disagreed that religion is a force for good in the world, dissentients being more numerous among men (50%) than women (41%);

78% (82% of the over-55s) agreed and 12% disagreed that religion should be a private matter and had no place in politics;

16% agreed and 70% disagreed that Christians and the Church should have more influence over politics in the country – only among the over-55s did the proportion in favour of the proposition scrape above one-fifth;

61% agreed and 18% disagreed that organized religion is in terminal decline in the UK – the over-55s (67%) were most prone to agree and Londoners (21%) to disagree;

40% agreed and 40% disagreed that the decline of organized religion had made Britain a worse place – the over-55s (54%) were twice as likely to agree as the 18-34s (27%);

51% (57% in Scotland) agreed and 32% (37% among men) disagreed that all religions are equally valid;

34% agreed and 49% disagreed that some religions are better than others, men (39%), the over-55s (38%), and Londoners (38%) being disproportionately likely to agree;

49% agreed and 29% disagreed that it is good for children to be brought up within a religion – among the 18-34s opinion divided at 36% each (whereas for the over-55s 64% agreed and 22% disagreed);

40% agreed (rising to 46% of men and 44% of 18-34s) and 39% disagreed that religion is incompatible with modern scientific knowledge;

29% agreed and 54% disagreed that there are some things in life which only religion can explain, the over-55s (35%) placing more trust in religion than the 18-34s (24%);

All in all, these data point to a society in which religion is increasingly in retreat and nominal. With the principal exception of the older age groups, many of those who claim some religious allegiance fail to underpin it by a belief in God or to translate it into regular prayer or attendance at a place of worship. People in general are more inclined to see the negative than the positive aspects of religion, and they certainly want to keep it well out of the political arena.
.

This echoes what this year's British Social Attitudes Survey discovered:

Quote:
Levels of religiosity have declined over the past three decades and are likely to decline further, mainly as a result of generational replacement ... This change - which is likely to continue - can be explained by generational replacement with older, more religious generations dying out and being replaced by less religious generations. There is little evidence that substantial numbers find religion as they get older.


So all in all, despite the eccentricity of some of the results (79% agreed  that religion is a cause of much misery and conflict in the world today; 72% agreed that religion is used as an excuse for bigotry and intolerance; 45% disagreed that religion is a force for good in the world, yet 49% agreed that it is good for children to be brought up within a religion) the overall picture is that we're going in the right direction


This is brilliant news for Christian's. We should all rejoice this Sunday in Church. It is saying that everything is going wrong at the right time. Prophecy is being fulfilled. Thank you for bringing us that wonderful news. God bless you. It is truly a testimony builder and strengthener of faith to know that the scriptures are true.
cyberman

Re: Religion in Britain - 2011 census results

Sean wrote:

This is brilliant news for Christian's. ... It is saying that everything is going wrong at the right time.


So stuff 'going wrong' is what we want, is it? wtf?

So when you are in church, your collective intecessory prayers are all asking for stuff to go badly for people?

A touch of the Westborough Phelps version of Christianity, there, I think.
gone

Re: Religion in Britain - 2011 census results

deleted
shayanjameel08

In the 2011 Census, Christianity was the largest religion, with 33.2 million people (59.3 per cent of the population). The second largest religious group were Muslims with 2.7 million people (4.8 per cent of the population).
religion marriage http://shaadi-direct.com/

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