Archive for nglreturns.myfreeforum.org Nglreturns is a forum to discuss religion, philosophy, ethics etc...

NGLReturns Daily Quiz - Play here!
 



       nglreturns.myfreeforum.org Forum Index -> All faiths and none
Lexilogio

The future of belief

This is really aimed at the non believers.

Do you think there will ever be a time when no human believes in a deity/dieties, or do you think that belief is part of the nature (psychological make up) of human kind?

Although there are many I see around who don't believe - with the vast majority, that isn't active atheism, it's more a "don't know, don't care" attitude.

I think people will always seek for greater meaning, and through that, seek God.
gone

I think for a very long time to come some people will believe in a deity/ies.
IvyOwl

I'm reasonably sure that people will continue to believe in, if not actual deities, some kind of ... oh what shall I call it 'supernatural'. Some of the natural stuff can seem like super and in any case our understanding of how the physical world works is very incomplete.

It's finding the right words to discuss this sort of thing that I find problematic. The realms where quantum physics and philosphy meet.

What I'm not so sure about is the Abrahmic god belief. On paper it would seem that an awful lot of people do believe in that one counting the three main religions that do. But every believer has internalised their own version which may or may not bear much ressemblance to the one preached by whatever church/synagogue/mosque they belong to.

Whilst I can understand the need for/desire to believe in a god what I don't understand is why so many people base it on the Abrahmic version. Well I suppose it's because it's the religion that's there ready made, well at least the basis thereof.  

So I would surmise that people will continue to believe but increasingly gain confidence to  branch out on their own away from the dogma of the established churches and the personality led cults.

The latter are the ones that I find worrying. I'd no idea how prevalent the YECs were until coming on these boards. Frankly it baffles and angers me in equal measure that so many people are being deceived. Particularly as knowing the science doesn't negate the God belief.

Peoples private beliefs are one thing when other people use those beliefs to gain power that's when they have the potential to be dangerous.

There again who knows?

IvyOwl
genghiscant

I think the need to believe in a supernatural god is within some people & no amount of logic & reason will change their minds.
Leonard James

I think there will probably always be people who look to a supernatural explanation while there are unanswered questions, although I'm not sure it will always be a specific 'god'.

Hopefully, people will finally come to realise that all the 'gods' are simply human inventions, but that does not mean they will give up the idea of the supernatural existing, and look to it as an explanation for things science can't answer.
Shaker

Quote:
Do you think there will ever be a time when no human believes in a deity/dieties, or do you think that belief is part of the nature (psychological make up) of human kind?

Although there are many I see around who don't believe - with the vast majority, that isn't active atheism, it's more a "don't know, don't care" attitude.

I think people will always seek for greater meaning, and through that, seek God.

I don't think there will ever be a time when belief in the supernatural dies away entirely, and I regret that fact. For the vast majority of people it's an instinctive, almost automatic reaction that in the face of suffering and death - that of others and their own - they have to cast around for something, anything that they will see as a means of avoiding the inevitable. It probably is a part of the psychological make-up of humankind.

Clearly not a part of the psychological make-up of everyone, however, and arguably of fewer and fewer people: over very long time spans these things are capable of change. (That's evolution, after all). If I had to give a prediction as to what will happen over the next few centuries - bearing in mind that it's easy to be an armchair Nostradamus when you or anyone else isn't going to be around to see if you were right or not -, extrapolating from what we've seen happen not just over the past few decades but the last couple of centuries, I strongly suspect that formal belief in the developed world will continue to fall away and become even more of a minority interest than it is now, pushing further and further to the margins of society. I think we'll see a spike in more literalist and fundamentalist forms of theism in Africa, the far east (especially China and Korea) and in the Muslim world but that this too will fall down the other side of the bell curve in due course. Material affluence, economic prosperity and education seem, over all, to be inimical to religious belief: if globalisation continues at its current pace this is going to have a knock-on effect on religion in those developing countries which are to some extent adopting western ways and even values.
trentvoyager

Shaker wrote:
Quote:
Do you think there will ever be a time when no human believes in a deity/dieties, or do you think that belief is part of the nature (psychological make up) of human kind?

Although there are many I see around who don't believe - with the vast majority, that isn't active atheism, it's more a "don't know, don't care" attitude.

I think people will always seek for greater meaning, and through that, seek God.

I don't think there will ever be a time when belief in the supernatural dies away entirely, and I regret that fact. For the vast majority of people it's an instinctive, almost automatic reaction that in the face of suffering and death - that of others and their own - they have to cast around for something, anything that they will see as a means of avoiding the inevitable. It probably is a part of the psychological make-up of humankind.

Clearly not a part of the psychological make-up of everyone, however, and arguably of fewer and fewer people: over very long time spans these things are capable of change. (That's evolution, after all). If I had to give a prediction as to what will happen over the next few centuries - bearing in mind that it's easy to be an armchair Nostradamus when you or anyone else isn't going to be around to see if you were right or not -, extrapolating from what we've seen happen not just over the past few decades but the last couple of centuries, I strongly suspect that formal belief in the developed world will continue to fall away and become even more of a minority interest than it is now, pushing further and further to the margins of society. I think we'll see a spike in more literalist and fundamentalist forms of theism in Africa, the far east (especially China and Korea) and in the Muslim world but that this too will fall down the other side of the bell curve in due course. Material affluence, economic prosperity and education seem, over all, to be inimical to religious belief: if globalisation continues at its current pace this is going to have a knock-on effect on religion in those developing countries which are to some extent adopting western ways and even values.


That would seem to rely on a pretty big assumption. That being that we can maintain the level of affluence that we currently enjoy in som eparts of the globe.

That imo is a pretty big ask.

I think it much more likely that the wheels are going to come off the economic train of ever expanding consumption and we will return to a more fragmented, much less affluent, hungrier, and isolated (from other areas) world.

The darkness and despair that these changes will bring about will actually precipitate a return of large scale religion - just at the point when we will need it least!

Sorry to be so pessimistic - but we really are useless as animals sometimes.
IvyOwl

Shaker,

What on earth makes you think that material affluence is going to keep on growing and spreading? I'm with Trent on this one. When I wrote in my reply that I thought belief would continue  ... especially in some sort of internalised personal god ... it was with the more likely possibiity of tough times ahead in mind. For some people the situation will be so dire that they will need to reach out to something else. It seems after all to be a human trait whatever you or I may think of it.

The worry for me is that it will be the lunatic fringe of believers that take centre stage. Taking peoples worry away by telling them God will be along shortly to put it all right and we've got to see that those prophesies in the Bible are fulfilled to hasten his coming. That way the world will just get worse.

The optimist in me however can imagine that a quiet belief in 'something' else can help people get through, give then courage to fight difficulties and come up with creative solutions.

But like you I've no idea!

The only thing I can be reasonably sure about (after all it's just possible that we'll find a way of getting to another habitable planet) is that sooner or later a major extinction event will overtake us.

Meantime I won't begrudge anyone a comforting belief provided it doesn't put the rest of us in unneccessary jeopardy.

IvyOwl

       nglreturns.myfreeforum.org Forum Index -> All faiths and none
Page 1 of 1
Create your own free forum | Buy a domain to use with your forum