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Lexilogio

What is Love?

As it says on the headline...


What is Love?
What does it mean?
Jim

Re: What is Love?

Not 'what', surely;
'Who'.
The ultimate Love is God.
Ketty

I agree with Jim, ultimately: love is God.

However we know that people have all sorts of ideas around 'love', for some it's just another word for 'sex', for others it's a fluffy cloud of feeling good, and yet for others it could mean abuse - and as many definitions as there are people and experiences.

From my own Christian perspective 'love' is all about the greatest commandment, and it's very certainly a verb: something to be maintained and worked on.
Lexilogio

There are many kinds of love.

And the word is often misused.
There is the love of a parent to a child, and vice versa
There is the love of one adult to another, where they become a close team
trentvoyager

I think you'll find you have all missed the correct answer:

Love is never having to say your sorry.

*Flutters eyelashes ala Stresand in"What's up Doc"*
Lexilogio

trentvoyager wrote:
I think you'll find you have all missed the correct answer:

Love is never having to say your sorry.

*Flutters eyelashes ala Stresand in"What's up Doc"*


I love that film!
Lexilogio

But love is also when you say sorry - not because you were wrong, but because you cannot bear the hurt in the other person.
Ketty



trentvoyager wrote:

*Flutters eyelashes ala Stresand in"What's up Doc"*


I can do that.  Look:


Link
gone

The definition of love is very elusive, imo. From my point of view it is liking someone a lot. I couldn't love someone I didn't like.
Lexilogio

Floo wrote:
The definition of love is very elusive, imo. From my point of view it is liking someone a lot. I couldn't love someone I didn't like.


Love as platonic love - where you like someone a lot is one form of love.
Farmer Geddon

You may as well ask what is affection?

What is attraction?

What is compassion?

What is friendship?

What is romance?

What is vulnerability?

What is lust?


Need I go on?
Lexilogio

But defining those things can be useful. Love is seen as a key part of Christianity. But its hard to define. Is it simply a good friendship - or does love represent something with a greater level of selflessness?

Sometimes it can be useful to compare with another type of love. If you took the attraction out of the love between a couple - would you be left with an enduring, more selfless and deeper love than simply that between friends?

I guess I'm getting down to - do we actually love enough? (Settle down boys - I mean in terms of platonic, Christian love).
Farmer Geddon

Interesting that you equate Christian love with Plato..... as in its own little way Christianity is very rooted in the philosophy of Plato...

Plato often discusses the father-son relationship and the question of whether a father's interest in his sons has much to do with how well his sons turn out. A boy in ancient Athens was socially located by his family identity, and Plato often refers to his characters in terms of their paternal and fraternal relationships.


Just saying!!!
Ketty

"Man can try to name love, showering upon it all the names at his command, and he will still involve himself in endless self-deceptions. If he possesses a grain of wisdom, he will lay down his arms and name the unknown by the more unknown: by the name of God." - Carl Jung
gone

I just don't see how you can love a character in a book, even if the deity was the most loving of entities, which it certainly isn't if the deeds attributed to it had any basis in fact.
Lexilogio

Farmer Geddon wrote:
Interesting that you equate Christian love with Plato..... as in its own little way Christianity is very rooted in the philosophy of Plato...

Plato often discusses the father-son relationship and the question of whether a father's interest in his sons has much to do with how well his sons turn out. A boy in ancient Athens was socially located by his family identity, and Plato often refers to his characters in terms of their paternal and fraternal relationships.


Just saying!!!


Lol - I didn't - I used the term 'platonic' - to refer to a non sexual love.

Although I'm now curious how that word arose...
bnabernard

At one time famalies would be close,(village), and as the family increased the sons would build a house close to their father, daughters would move to be with their husbands who would be close to their fathers (a different village) villages would be self policing, platonic love would exist within a village, lust woud be for a neibouring village.

A breakdown in society comes from the breaking up of the family unit and love becomes hard to fathom because the unity no longer exists and the law of the greater family unit no longer exist's as strange faces become the norm.

bernard (hug)

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