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elevenses' pics
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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
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Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 9:17 pm    Post subject: elevenses' pics  Reply with quote




Since WW2 evidence of Ridge and Furrow has been removed by ploughing and development. It is typical of the open-field system used in the Middle Ages when as part of the labour contract of service to the landowner, the peasant was allowed to cultivate a strip of land. As part of my son's GCSE Geography Project, he studied his local area, Longlevens in Gloucester. He found out that the name derived from 'eleven strips' which are now buried under the parish church and the old centre of the village. There was evidence of it in the park behind my house, but that has now disappeared under school expansion. The arrangement of ridge and furrow originates from the design of the mediaeval plough. The farmer started in the middle of a strip at one end and ploughed up and down in a kind of long thin rectangular spiral, until the entire strip was ploughed. The plough sliced through the soil and turned it over to one side, just like a modern plough. Each time the farmer ploughed his strip, he would repeat this process, turning each slice of soil towards the centre of his strip. The effect of this, over many years, was to pile up the soil towards the centre of the strips. The furrows mark the dividing line between two strips.


Last edited by ELEVENSES81 on Wed Oct 29, 2014 6:53 pm; edited 1 time in total
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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 124


Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 9:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

One film that made a great impression on me as a teenager was the 1960 adaption of the DH Lawrence novel 'Sons and Lovers' starring Trevor Howard, Wendy Hiller, Mary Ure and the American actor Dean Stockwell. It won an Oscar for its director, Jack Cardiff. On paper Stockwell's casting should not work. His accent is not working class Nottingham but Henly-on-Thames and in truth his male beauty radiates the film. He plays the artistic son like an alien from a different planet and is just perfect.




Link


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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 124


Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote




In Richard Hoggart's 'The Uses of Literacy' [1956] he laments the post-war demise of working-class grassroots culture in the face of that manufactured by capitalist and corporate media. We may lament how native culture is so fragile that it cannot withstand the onslaught of westerm culture, but our own authentic local cultures have been under threat for longer. BBC4 some years ago showed a documentary about street games and described the transmission of skipping games from one generation of children to the next  as 'knowledge along a rope'. A beautifully poetic phrase which describes something magical owned by the children themselves.


Last edited by ELEVENSES81 on Wed Oct 29, 2014 4:25 pm; edited 1 time in total
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ELEVENSES81
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Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 9:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mike Leigh's new film about Turner starring Tim Spall promises to be a 2014 highlight. 'The Fighting Tereraire' is rightly a much loved painting. There is a lazy view of art that an artist just creates something and expects the audience to just make of it what they will. That may be true of some contemporary art and of course the viewer brings themselves to the art too. Turner expects the viewer to understand what they are seeing. It is not just a 'pretty' picture. The molten sunset, the modern steam tug and the old ghost ship it is pulling to the breaker's yard are all saying something.



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trentvoyager
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

 

Cheers Elevenses.

Good stuff.

Will comment when I have more time.
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Jim
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Location: South West Scotland

PostPosted: Tue Oct 28, 2014 11:27 pm    Post subject: Re: elevenses' pics Reply with quote

ELEVENSES81 wrote:

Click to see full size image

Since WW2 evidence of Ridge and Furrow has been removed by ploughing and development. It is typical of the open-field system used in the Middle Ages when as part of the labour contract of service to the landowner, the peasant was allowed to cultivate a strip of land. As part of my son's GCSE Geography Project, he studied his local area, Longlevens in Gloucester. He found out that the name derived from 'eleven strips' which are now buried under the parish church and the old centre of the village. There was evidence of it in the park behind my house, but that has now disappeared under school expansion. The arrangement of ridge and furrow originates from the design of the mediaeval plough. The farmer started in the middle of a strip at one end and ploughed up and down in a kind of long thin rectangular spiral, until the entire strip was ploughed. The plough sliced through the soil and turned it over to one side, just like a modern plough. Each time the farmer ploughed his strip, he would repeat this process, turning each slice of soil towards the centre of his strip. The effect of this, over many years, was to pile up the soil towards the centre of the strips. The furrows mark the dividing line between two strips.

-
Great image!

The rough equivalent of this in Scotland was the run-rig system, which still existed up heare as late as the 1860's in some parts of the Highlands and Western Isles
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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
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Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote




Magnificent image of Gresley's deeply flawed, but awesome Mikado 2-8-4 P2 built to single-head the Kings Cross- Aberdeen run. By 1940 all had been converted by Thompson into A2's. The group behind  the new 'A1' Tornado (seen on Top Gear) are building a new P2.


Last edited by ELEVENSES81 on Wed Oct 29, 2014 4:22 pm; edited 1 time in total
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ELEVENSES81
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Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 10:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



A sound redolent of my childhood living near the A45 in Coventry was that of the Commer coach fitted with the Rootes TS3 engine, a two-stroke diesel three-cylinder horizontally opposed piston engine, which came to be known as the "Commer Knocker" due to the unique noise it produced. They had a very good turn of speed and were lovely to ride in.

The one pictured belonged to the Wolverhampton carrier, Don Everall who used to have interests in logistics and aviation also.

Happy days!!!!l
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ELEVENSES81
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Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 10:16 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



I first saw a reproduction of The Bigger Splash in a Sunday supplement in the late 1960s and was blown away by it. For a lad in Coventry it held the promise of a lifestyle they could only dream about. It's simple geometry and bright slabs of colour are just stunning. The way the diver's splash is captured just at the moment it is about to break is very photgraphic and of course that is how the image was captured. Hockney has never had a problem with using the camera as a source of his art. When it was revealed that many of the great Dutch masters had used a camera-obscura (Vermeer. Van Eyck) to capture not only the images of domestic Dutch life, but the distortions of perspective too caused by using a camera, Hockney defended it's use on the grounds that it is ultimately the painter who makes a mark on the canvas
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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
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Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Wed Oct 29, 2014 10:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



William Holman Hunt's allegorical take on The Fall of Man. Just love the realism and intense colours. At first sight it appears as a simple victorian morality tale of a neglecful shepherd who abandons his sheep for the beautiful girl. Note the Deaths Head Hawkmoth he shows the girl and the apple-strewn foreground.

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