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Introduction to Original Christianity
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ceramic
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Joined: 18 May 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 14, 2009 10:12 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote

Ketty, I dunno - I get very confused  :shock: on the forums sometimes with whether someone is being serious or whether they are being light hearted ..etc ... honest ... its hard to gauge without the facial expressions!

Cest La Vie ... can only follow it up with another post to double check what the person has said .. or clarify oneself ...
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ceramic
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 16, 2009 2:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The virtue of Philotimo in the Orthodox heart:

"Philotimo is that deep-seated awareness in the heart that motivates the good that a person does. A philotimos person is one who conceives and enacts eagerly those things good."

See NGL thread, http://nglreturns.myfreeforum.org/sutra28536.php#28536
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ceramic
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2009 7:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Bridegroom

Christ stands outside the door of our soul and knocks for us to open to Him, but He doesn't enter. He doesn't want to violate the freedom which He Himself gave us.

"Behold, I stand at the door and knock. If anyone will hear my voice and open the door, I will come in to him, and I will dine with him, and he with me." (Rev 3:20)

Christ is courteous. He stands outside the door of our soul and knocks gently. If we open to Him, He will enter us and give us everything - Himself - secretly and silently.



O Lord, by They Holy Spirit enlighten Thy people that all may know Thy love

O Merciful Lord, let all mankind, from Adam to the end of time, come to know Thee, that Thou art good and merciful, that all nations may rejoice in Thy peace, and behold the light of Thy countenance. Thy gaze is tranquil and meek and draws the soul to Thee.

- St. Silouan the Athonite


Last edited by ceramic on Tue Aug 25, 2009 10:43 am; edited 1 time in total
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ceramic
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2009 10:05 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Those who want to be saved scrutinize not the shortcomings of their neighbor but always their own and they set about eliminating them.

Such was the man who saw his brother doing wrong and groaned, 'Woe is me; him today - me tomorrow!'

You see his caution? You see the preparedness of his mind? How he swiftly foresaw how to avoid judging his brother?

St. Dorotheos of Gaza
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ceramic
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 25, 2009 10:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Lives of the Saints are a sort of Orthodox Encyclopedia. In them can be found everything which is necessary for the soul which hungers and thirsts for eternal righteousness and eternal truth in this life, and which hungers and thirsts for Divine immortality and eternal life. If faith is what you need, there you will find it in abundance: and you will feed your soul with food which will never make it hungry. If you need love, truth, righteousness, hope, meekness, humility, repentance, prayer, or whatever virtue or spiritual struggle and will obtain grace-filled help for every virtue.
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ceramic
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2009 6:00 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The ANNUAL MIRACLE OF THE HOLY FIRE
at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (Easter)

The ceremony, which awes the souls of Christians, takes place in the Church of the Resurrection in Jerusalem. The date for Pascha is determined anew for every year. It must be a first Sunday after the spring equinox and Jewish Passover. Therefore, most of the time it differs from the date of Catholic and Protestant Easter, which is determined using different criteria.

The Holy Fire is the most renowned miracle in the world of Eastern Orthodoxy. It has taken place at the same time, in the same manner, in the same place every single year for centuries. No other miracle is known to occur so regularly and so steadily over time.

It happens in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem, the holiest place on earth, where Christ was crucified, entombed, and where He finally rose from the dead.

The miracle of the Holy Fire is almost unknown in the West.

In Protestant areas it may, to a certain extent, be explained by the fact that there is no real tradition of miracles; people don't really know in which box to place the miracles, and they rarely feature in newspapers. In the Catholic tradition, however, since there is vast interest in miracles they do know.

Why is it not more well known?

For this only one explanation suffices: Church politics.

Only the Orthodox Churches attend the ceremony which is centered on the miracle.

It only occurs on the Orthodox date of Easter and without the presence of any Roman Catholic authorities.
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ceramic
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PostPosted: Wed Nov 18, 2009 10:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sunday, November 15, marked the beginning of the Nativity Fast (40 days before Christmas).

How did the contemporary Nativity Fast come to be?


The first mention of a preparatory period before Christmas is mentioned in a decree of the Council of Saragossa (380). The Council Fathers stated that every Christian should daily go to church from December 17 until the Theophany (January 6th). At the Synod of Mac (581) in Gaul (present day France) it was decreed that from November 11, the day of St. Martin, until December 24 every Christian should fast three times a week (Monday, Wednesday, Friday).

Our pre-Nativity period of preparation developed rather late. Scholars do not agree about the exact time it began. Some hold that it began in the sixth century. Others believe it began in the seventh or eighth century. The present liturgical pre-Nativity season was finally established at the Council of Constantinople (1166). The Council decreed that the fast would begin on November 15 and last until December 24 inclusive. Thus, there was created another 40 day fast.

The pre-Nativity fast is often called "Philip's Fast" because it begins on the day after the feast of St. Philip. The fast was introduced to prepare the Church for a worthy celebration of the great and holy day of the Birth of Christ. The regulations for the fast were far more lenient than the Great Fast before Pascha. Only Monday, Wednesday, and Friday were days of strict fasting without meat, dairy products or oil (in Slavic countries). On Sundays fish was permitted. Lay people were at first permitted to eat fish on other days, too, until the monastic rigoristic influence prevailed.

It is interesting to observe that the famous 12th century Byzantine canonist Balsamon expressed the opinion that it would be enough if the lay people fasted only one week before Christmas. In 1958 a modern Greek author, Christos M. Enislides, welcomes Balsamon's suggestion and believes that the best solution would be for the Church at large to abstain from meat and dairy products for 33 days; during the last seven days of the fast everybody should observe the strict fast. But for now this is a mere proposition and should not be seen as the rule.

-----

“If we fast but do not forgive our enemies – our fasting is of no use. If we fast and do not find it drawing us into humility – our fasting is of no use. If our fasting does not make us yet more keenly aware of the fact that we are sinful before all and responsible to all then it is of no benefit. If our fasting does not unite us with the life of God – which is meek and lowly – then it is again of no benefit”.

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