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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 124


Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2014 3:37 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote

How Long  Paul Carrack


Link


He had a hit with this in 1974 with Ace.

Just a great pop song.
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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 124


Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2014 10:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The French Connection (1971) starring Gene Hackman, Roy Scheider and Fernando Ray. Directed by William Friedkin



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The most enjoyable film of its type I've ever watched. Gene Hackman inhabits the role of 'Popeye' Doyle and the dialogue sparkles, if somewhat lost on me at times. What is 'a policy guy'?

In the nightclub

            DOYLE
           I make at least two junk connections
           at that table in the corner.  The
           guy is the stripe combo, I know him
           too.

                        RUSSO
           Hey, I thought we come for a drink.

INT. THE CLUB - NIGHT

A long view of the table with DOYLE and RUSSO very close
foreground, left and right.  DOYLE is leaning on an elbow.

                        DOYLE
           Who is that guy?

                        RUSSO
           Policy man in Queens.

                        DOYLE
           What about the last of the big-time
           spenders.  You make him?




http://www.scoutingny.com/french-connection-filming-locations/

http://www.asliceofbrooklyn.com/pizza.html

http://nymag.com/visitorsguide/sightseeing/citytours.htm
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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 124


Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Fri Nov 07, 2014 11:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Stottie Cake




Just feeling a bit peckish right now, and would love a hunk of cob with butter, but only have boring white sliced. I've only been to Newcastle once when I went there as part of my job  [1989?]. I was taken to a pub and had a ploughmans with a divine bit of baking on the side called a stottie cake. I could murder one now.

http://metro.co.uk/2014/03/10/sto...cook-the-perfect-stottie-4461403/
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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 124


Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 7:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trebetherick



We used to picnic where the thrift
Grew deep and tufted to the edge;
We saw the yellow foam flakes drift
In trembling sponges on the ledge
Below us, till the wind would lift
Them up the cliff and o’er the hedge.
Sand in the sandwiches, wasps in the tea,
Sun on our bathing dresses heavy with the wet,
Squelch of the bladder-wrack waiting for the sea,
Fleas around the tamarisk, an early cigarette.



We can probably all  recall coming across John Betjeman's memory poem of holidays in Cornwall from school. He so loved Cornwall that he is buried in the churchyard at Trebetherick. Today Cornwall makes us think of Rick Stein and breathtaking sea cliffs, but the county is actually an economic blackspot where pay is low and seasonal with empty second homes that deny local young people any opportunity to remain in the county.

I haven't  been back since I hitch-hiked there from Coventry aged 16 during a school summer holiday [1966] after 'O' levels. We got as far south as Padstow when our money ran out and had to hitch back. I don't remember much about it other than the tedium of waiting for a lift and the spartan youth hostels [I lived on fried spam and tinned tomatoes for three weeks]. The cute Frenchies and Germans used to park their 2CVs nearby so as not to alert the wardens that they were not suffering like the rest of us. The funniest moment was meeting this guy who regaled us in the hostel about meeting the Michelin Rubber Man giving him a lift in his truck. It seemed surreal and hilarious at 16.

I do remember the beautiful foreign girls we used to share the hostels with, but always thought them too old [all of 18] and sophisticated to talk to schoolboys. By this time I was attempting to write poetry to give voice to my own romantic yearnings.

I wrote this offering after catching the bus for Rock for the ferry to Padstow from Trebetherick .This was my elegy for a wasted opportunity, my 'Cider With Rosie' moment:

On a crowded bus, brave with cider I offered her my knees
Wind-tossed and curled she used me as a chair, laughed with her friends
I, inanimate and wordless felt her scented weight
And when, without a look, she departed at some lonely halt
A little part of me took flight
Never to return - from Trebetherick

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Shaker
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Joined: 25 Aug 2008
Posts: 8694



PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 7:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Today Cornwall makes us think of Rick Stein and breathtaking sea cliffs


Well, yes, him ... but personally it also makes me think instantly of the wonderful Charles Causley ('Death of a Pupil' is a favourite):

Now that you leave me for that other friend,
Rich as the rubbed sun, elegant of eye,
Who watched, in lost light, your five fortunes end
And wears the weapons of the wasted sky.

Often, I say, I saw him at your gate,
Noted well how he passed the time of day,
Gazed, with bright greed, at your young man’s estate
And how, in fear, I looked the other way.

For we had met, this thief and I, before
On terrible seas, at the spoiled city’s heart,
And when I saw him standing at your door
Nothing, I knew, could put you now apart.

O with sly promises he stroked the air,
Struck, on the coin of day, his gospel face.
I saw you turn, touch his hand, unaware
Of his thorned kiss or of his grave embrace.

_________________
There’s no reason to be agnostic about ideas that are dramatically incompatible with everything we know about modern science. - Sean M. Carroll
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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 124


Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Three splendid tracks from David Sylvian and Virginia Astley from the 1980's. With the contributions of the likes of Robert Fripp and Ryuichi Sakamoto these are tracks of the highest quality.  

September



Link


Let the happiness in


Link


Some small hope


Link
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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 124


Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 7:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shaker wrote:
Quote:
Today Cornwall makes us think of Rick Stein and breathtaking sea cliffs


Well, yes, him ... but personally it also makes me think instantly of the wonderful Charles Causley ('Death of a Pupil' is a favourite):

Now that you leave me for that other friend,
Rich as the rubbed sun, elegant of eye,
Who watched, in lost light, your five fortunes end
And wears the weapons of the wasted sky.

Often, I say, I saw him at your gate,
Noted well how he passed the time of day,
Gazed, with bright greed, at your young man’s estate
And how, in fear, I looked the other way.

For we had met, this thief and I, before
On terrible seas, at the spoiled city’s heart,
And when I saw him standing at your door
Nothing, I knew, could put you now apart.

O with sly promises he stroked the air,
Struck, on the coin of day, his gospel face.
I saw you turn, touch his hand, unaware
Of his thorned kiss or of his grave embrace.


I don't mind Rick, and as TV chefs go he makes an engaging host. Cornwall has nothing going for it other than tourism, so he does bring in money for Padstow. There would be empty second homes in Padstow whether Rick Stein was there or not.
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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 124


Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 8:00 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have always loved this one

Who?


Who is that child I see wandering, wandering
down by the side of the quivering stream?
Why does he seem not to hear, though I call to him?
Where does he come from, and what is his name?

Why do I see him at sunrise and sunset
taking, in old-fashioned clothes, the same track?
Why, when he walks, does he cast not a shadow
though the sun rises and falls at his back?

Why does the dust lie so thick on the hedgerow
by the great field where a horse pulls the plough?
Why do I see only meadows, where houses
stand in a line by the riverside now?

Why does he move like a wraith by the water,
soft as the thistledown on the breeze blown?
When I draw near him so that I may hear him,
why does he say that his name is my own?
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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 124


Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 8:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Is that all there is?  written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller sung by Peggy Lee

It has a clear existentialist theme whether it was intended or not. Sartre described the human experience as a 'thirst' that could never be quenched - nothing was ever quite enough.



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ELEVENSES81
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Joined: 18 Oct 2014
Posts: 124


Location: Gloucester

PostPosted: Sat Nov 08, 2014 9:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Lion in Winter [1968] staring Katherine Hepburn and Peter 'o' Toole'. What a genius John Barry was - the Bond  OO7 theme and this musical score.

The film describes the tempestuous personal and dynastic battles between Henry 11 of England and his wife Eleanore of Aquitaine and how she used their sons in the battle to retain her French territories. The music in the video accompanies the arrival of Elaenore who Henry has released from prison for Christmas to stay with him at Chinon.  



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Last edited by ELEVENSES81 on Sun Nov 09, 2014 11:56 am; edited 1 time in total
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