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Worst 10 works of fiction
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david_geoffrey
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PostPosted: Tue Oct 14, 2008 11:08 am    Post subject:  Reply with quote

krysta25uk wrote:
One Hundred Years of Solitude
Great Expectations
The Grapes of Wrath

Three books I found so boring I counldn't finish.

Krysta

I could cry Krysta,  :cry:  :cry:  :cry:   you have just named three of my favourite books of all time...especially the first two which on the top 10 books list make it into mine. I have read 100 years of Solitude twice and Great Expectations about 4 times....

Hey ho though, each to their own  

As well as Of Mice and Men which is much shorter, but is a bit gloomy, you should try Steinbeck's Cannery Road. Whimsical yes, but very funny and in Doc you have one of the great character's in literature. He is described thus
Quote:
Doc would listen to any kind of nonsense and change it for you to a kind of wisdom. His mind had no horizon—and his sympathy had no warp. . . . He lived in a world of wonders, of excitement.


Aslo love Hemingway, don't agree he is misogynistic (especially OM&TS), but he does write about men mostly and what is wrong with that?

Never read Da Vinci code, so can't really give an opinion...so worst books? Not sure if I can really say there are any, I have always found something to enjoy in almost everything I have read.
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Conspiracist
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 30, 2009 11:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Barefoot in the Head - Brian Aldiss

Words fail me.
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Lexilogio
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 7:57 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Conspiracist wrote:
Barefoot in the Head - Brian Aldiss

Words fail me.





Smilie_PDT I read 3 of Aldiss's books - considered to be seminal works of Sci fi - but to be honest - after coming from Iain M Banks, I was sorely disappointed. He reminds me a bit like CS Lewis and Stephen King, in that he feels the need to take the story too far, instead of knowing when the entertainment has stopped. (I realise some people may be upset by the CS Lewis reference - I loved the first 5 of the Narnia books, but hated the last one).
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krysta25uk
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 8:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Have to agree about CS Lewis Lexi.  The first three Narnia were good but the last I found weren't as good.  Should have stopped at four.
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Conspiracist
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 8:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
He reminds me a bit like CS Lewis and Stephen King


I hate King. He has this peculiar knack of giving the impression that something really impressive is going to happen in a few paragraphs time, so you keep turning the pages waiting for the thing to happen and then suddenly its the end of the book. I read two or three of his "books" before I cottoned on to what he was doing, representing several hours of my life that I will never get back.
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Pukon_the_Treen
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 8:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

krysta & Lexi

Quote:
Have to agree about CS Lewis Lexi.  The first three Narnia were good but the last I found weren't as good.  Should have stopped at four.


Agreed muchly.  Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe is ok, Magician's Nephew is much better as is Prince Caspian and Horse and his boy (if you can swallow the racism) but after that the moralising started to get in the way of the story (or I was just a bit older when I read them so I was better at spotting all the Christian metaphors).  Last Battle was atrocious.

The trouble is, C S Lewis had a good scope of imagination and was a fairly good storyteller, but his use of language was rubbish.  Compare Lewis to Kenneth Grahame, or A A Milne, E Nesbit, L. Frank Baum and Richmal Crompton and you can really see the difference; they don't talk down to children, and they love language, whereas Lewis just loves Jesus and moralising.

Personally I grew up on Susan Cooper, Alan Garner, William Mayne, Robert Westall and Ursula Le Guin and they are a far superior class of writer to Lewis.
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Last edited by Pukon_the_Treen on Tue Mar 31, 2009 10:03 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Lexilogio
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 9:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

E Nesbitt was one of my favourites as a child, along with Louisa May Alcott and Penelope Lively. Until I discovered Tolkein, and then moved into sci fi at about 10.

I'm just about to start reading "Οι Ιστορείς του Μπιντλ του Βαρδος"  (The History of Beadle the Bard), which was a Mother's Day gift.

After that.... I fancy reading a modern book - but I find so many of the advertised modern books are incredibly disappointing.
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Pukon_the_Treen
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
E Nesbitt was one of my favourites as a child, along with Louisa May Alcott and Penelope Lively. Until I discovered Tolkein, and then moved into sci fi at about 10.


Similar pattern to me by the look of things!  Louisa May Alcott's not my thing, but Penelope Lively certainly deserves a mention.  Have you read any Diana Wynne Jones?

I've got so much course work to read at the moment I'm not reading much for pleasure.  Got a book of M. R. James ghost stories on the go (and my ever-present Lovecraft of course) but that's just comfort reading really.  I was reading Jack Vance 'Tales of the Dying Earth' until fairly recently, but I've had to put it aside for now while I do other things.
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Lexilogio
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
Have you read any Diana Wynne Jones?


No - but having just looked her up - she wrote the incredible Howls Moving Castle! I'm buying that at the next trip to the bookshop.

I would strongly recommend The Sparrow, by Mary Doria Russel. It's a fantastic book which deals with a Jesuit Priest who is on the first mission to another inhabited planet.
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Pukon_the_Treen
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PostPosted: Tue Mar 31, 2009 10:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I hate the acclaim that Rowling gets for her third-rate unoriginal two dimensional turgid stuff (especially when she seems totally scornful of the fantasy genre and claims to have single-handedly reinvented it) when Diana Wynne Jones has been writing far better and more original stuff for decades!

Howls Moving Castle is very good but possibly her best is one called Hexwood – very sophisticated for a kids book.  Also worth a look is 'Eight Days of Luke' (about the Norse gods) and 'The Homeward Bounders'.

Quote:
I would strongly recommend The Sparrow, by Mary Doria Russel. It's a fantastic book which deals with a Jesuit Priest who is on the first mission to another inhabited planet.


Looks interesting; I'll keep an eye out.  What did you think of C S Lewis's Sci Fi?


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