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Worst 10 works of fiction
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Silver
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Joined: 02 Oct 2008
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PostPosted: Tue Apr 21, 2009 9:56 pm    Post subject:  Reply with quote

I liked the thin volumes of Robert Heinlein and I was recommended the larger volumes: Stranger in a Strange Land and Time Enough For Love, so I gave them a try.

Boring!!!

It turned out that the guy who had recommended them to me had never read them but been recommended them.
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BevIsHopeful
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PostPosted: Thu Apr 30, 2009 4:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lexilogio wrote:

Sorrows of Young Wether by Goethe



I recently read, Lexi, that Goethe hated this work, and he wished it to be forgotten.  Apparently, at the time of his writing it, he was hailed as being the first German writer to expose the then silent suffering many people endured because of lost hopes, lost love.  After its publication, an entire bohemian-styled, upper-class culture openly embraced the stark, emotional drama as something worthy of elevating in the public consciousness.  In a sense, he saw them valuing tragedy, and he hated it.  Not to mention he had unintentionally embarrassed a couple, good friends of his, at the time well-known in the community.  He had secretly fallen in love with Charlotte, the fiance of his good friend at the time, and when another acquaintance took his own life (some guy with the last name Jerusalem) after he was rebuffed by the wife of his good friend, he was instantly inspired to write Werther.  Goethe infused his own before-unknown feelings for Charlotte into the characters he outwardly intended to pattern after Jerusalem and the woman he had fallen for, but after its publication, Charlotte and her now husband came under public scrutiny, her reputation now on the line.

Anyway, I found it interesting that he would regret the writing, especially when it had become so wildly successful.  

I'm definitely going to read it now.  
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Silver
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2009 9:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Decades ago now but I found the original Dracula book (Bram Stoker) boring, unlike Frankenstein which was excellent.
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BevIsHopeful
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 24, 2009 10:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Silver wrote:
Decades ago now but I found the original Dracula book (Bram Stoker) boring, unlike Frankenstein which was excellent.


:smt045
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jeremyp
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 03, 2009 9:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Lord of the Rings.

About five times longer than the plot, no character development.  Deserves a nod for starting a genre but annoyingly there are so many aged hippies who like it that any public vote for the "greatest novel" gets distorted to the point where it wins.
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Lexilogio
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 03, 2009 9:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BevIsHopeful wrote:
Lexilogio wrote:

Sorrows of Young Wether by Goethe



I recently read, Lexi, that Goethe hated this work, and he wished it to be forgotten.  Apparently, at the time of his writing it, he was hailed as being the first German writer to expose the then silent suffering many people endured because of lost hopes, lost love.  After its publication, an entire bohemian-styled, upper-class culture openly embraced the stark, emotional drama as something worthy of elevating in the public consciousness.  In a sense, he saw them valuing tragedy, and he hated it.  Not to mention he had unintentionally embarrassed a couple, good friends of his, at the time well-known in the community.  He had secretly fallen in love with Charlotte, the fiance of his good friend at the time, and when another acquaintance took his own life (some guy with the last name Jerusalem) after he was rebuffed by the wife of his good friend, he was instantly inspired to write Werther.  Goethe infused his own before-unknown feelings for Charlotte into the characters he outwardly intended to pattern after Jerusalem and the woman he had fallen for, but after its publication, Charlotte and her now husband came under public scrutiny, her reputation now on the line.

Anyway, I found it interesting that he would regret the writing, especially when it had become so wildly successful.  

I'm definitely going to read it now.  


Have you read it yet?

I warn you, it even beats Tolstoys "The Death of Ivan Ilyich" for depressing.
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Dave B
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PostPosted: Thu Dec 03, 2009 10:46 pm    Post subject: Re: Worst 10 works of fiction Reply with quote

BevIsHopeful wrote:

The Handmaids Tale -- Margaret Atwood (although I would agree it was exquisitely written.)
That is strange. I heard it on the radio and enjoyed it, but could not get on with the book.

I should say that L E Modesitt's "Recluse" series has some serious errors - too many similarities between the books in detail and some appalling English (even for an American writer) and some never seemed to have been proof read (a character's name was changed part way through in one!). But, for some reason, I find them strangely compelling.

Modesitt seems more like a committee than an individual, some of his books seem so different in all ways as to have been written by another person.
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Shaker
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2009 2:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The Handmaids Tale -- Margaret Atwood (although I would agree it was exquisitely written.)

I agree. I read it recently. Yes, it's well written, but I found it an almost entirely dislikable read in a way that I can't quite put my finger on. There's something thin and unsatisfying about it that went against the grain with me.

Still, my loss is the charity shop's gain.
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LornaDoone40
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 04, 2009 10:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I felt similarly about 'French Lieutenants Woman' - simply couldn't stand John Fowler at all, despite how well written it was.

And I can't be doing with D H Lawrence at all. I think it was the overwhelming feeling that both these writers were entirely fascinated by their own mental naval fluff, which grated on me very quickly indeed.
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Humph Warden Bennett
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 21, 2011 9:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

LornaDoone40 wrote:
The French Lieutenants Woman.

The Old Man And The Sea.

Anything by DH Lawrence.


Not so sure about Lawrence, but pretty much anything by Thomas Hardy, whom I find overlong & throughly miserable. The only Hardy work that I quite enjoyed was "The Wellbeloved", which is uncharacteristically short, and has a bittersweet rather than a depressing ending.

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